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AR-Coated Single Mode Fiber Optic Patch Cables


  • One AR-Coated Connector for Fiber-to-Free Space Applications
  • One Uncoated Connector for Fiber-to-Fiber Connections
  • AR Coating Improves System Transmission and Reduces Back Reflections
  • FC/PC and FC/APC Connectors Available

Coated End Labeled with
Part Number and AR Coating
Range for Easy Identification

P4-305AR-2

AR-Coated FC/APC Connector

Related Items


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Item #
Prefix
AR-Coated
Connector
Uncoated
Connector
P1 FC/PC FC/PC
P5 FC/PC FC/APC
P4 FC/APC FC/PC
P3 FC/APC FC/APC

Features

  • One AR-Coated FC/PC or FC/APC Connector for Fiber-to-Free Space Use
  • Ideal for Use with Our Fiber Collimation Packages and FiberPorts to Minimize Fresnel Losses
  • AR Coating Improves Return Loss
  • One Uncoated FC/PC or FC/APC Connector for Fiber-to-Fiber Connection

Thorlabs offers patch cables with a single, antireflection-coated FC/PC or FC/APC connector on one side and an uncoated FC/PC or FC/APC connector on the other. The AR coating is designed to minimize reflections when either launching a free-space beam out of a fiber or coupling a free-space beam into a fiber. Depending on the cable selected, the coated connector provides an average reflectivity of <1%, <0.75% or <0.5% over the designated AR coating ranges (click on the AR Coating Reflectivity graphs in the tables below for more information). Each of these cables features Ø3 mm Kevlar reinforced furcation tubing (FT030-Y). Each section of patch cables below is grouped by their best performance range, which is achieved where the specified operating wavelength ranges of the bare fiber and the AR coating overlap.

Fiber-to-Free Space Coupling
When coupling from a fiber into free space, such as when using one of our fiber collimators or FiberPort collimators/couplers, the return loss (absence of signals reflected back to the source by the glass-air interface at the end of the fiber) will be worse than comparable values for fiber-to-fiber coupling. By depositing an AR coating on the fiber end face, the return loss of an FC/PC connector can be improved by ~8 - 10 dB, and the return loss of an FC/APC connector can be improved by ~2 - 5 dB. For example, in our testing, a cable with an uncoated FC/PC connector has a typical return loss of ~15 dB (3.16%), while an AR-coated FC/PC connector with the same fiber has an improved return loss of ~24 dB (0.40%). AR-coated connectors also increase transmission when coupling a free-space beam into a fiber. For more testing data, please see the Lab Facts tab.

Note: The AR-coated end is meant for free-space applications (e.g., collimation) and will be damaged if it comes into contact with another connector tip. Mating two AR-coated connectors can increase back reflections, causing a greater loss of transmission than when just using two uncoated connectors.

There are several methods for cleaning an AR-coated connector end without damaging the coating. Gently spraying compressed air over the connector tip is ideal. Other methods include gently wiping using a lint-free optical cloth or FCC-7020 Fiber Connector Cleaner soaked with isopropanol or methanol. Dry wipes should not be used as this can damage the AR coating.

Custom Patch Cables

Custom-coated patch cables are also available. Contact Tech Support for more details. For shorter wavelengths, Thorlabs also offers Low-Insertion-Loss Patch Cables, which feature handpicked single mode fiber with tighter core concentricity specifications for lower insertion loss and higher transmission. If you cannot find the appropriate stock patch cable your application requires, Thorlabs also offers custom-connectorized patch cables with same-day shipping.

Return Loss Measurement Step 1
Figure 1: Measuring the Incident Optical Power
Return Loss Measurement Step 2
Figure 2: Measuring the Reflected Optical Power

Thorlabs Lab Fact: Fiber to Free Space Return Loss Comparison Test Data

In fiber-to-free-space and free-space-to-fiber applications, Fresnel reflections typically occur at the glass to air interface because of the index of refraction discontinuity. These reflections are specified as the return loss, or signals reflected back to the light source instead of exiting the fiber. For a standard, uncoated fiber, the reflectivity (or return loss expressed as a decimal) can be calculated using the following formula, assuming normal incidence:

Fresnel Reflections Equation

where R is the reflectivity, n0 is the index of refraction of air (~1), and ns is the index of refraction of the fiber's silica core (~1.5). Using these typical values, an uncoated fiber will experience a typical reflectivity of approximately 4%. AR-coated cables use a dielectric stack antireflective coating on the fiber tip to minimize back reflections, thus lowering return loss and increasing transmission.

Experimental Setup
AR-coated and standard PM patch cables were tested for return loss in a fiber-to-free space application. First, the light source was connected to a 2x2 50:50 SM coupler, while the opposite legs of the coupler were connected to a power meter and terminator as shown in Figure 1. In this configuration the power meter measures the optical power in that leg of the coupler. Next, the cable's uncoated connector was connected to the coupler, and the coated connector was left unconnected and open to the air. The power meter was moved to the open leg on the light source side and used to measure the reflected power, as shown in Figure 2. Using this data and taking into account the insertion loss of the coupler, return loss in dB can be calculated:

Optical Return Loss

Where RL is the return loss in dB or percent, Pi is the incident optical power measured in Figure 1, Pr is the reflected optical power measured in Figure 1, and ILc is the insertion loss of the coupler. Return loss in percent (reflectivity) can also be calculated:

Return Loss Equation in Percent

Results
Both the AR-coated cables and the equivalent uncoated cables were tested in the same fashion, and the results are shown in the table to the right. The improvement in return loss when using AR-coated cables is apparent.

Fiber-to-Free Space Return Loss Test Data
Coated Cable
Item #
Coated
Return Loss
Coated Reflectivity
(RL in %)
Uncoated Cable
Item #
Uncoated
Return Loss
Uncoated Reflectivity
(RL in %)
P1-305AR-2 22.4 dB 0.57% P1-305A-FC-2 15.6 dB 2.7542%
P5-305AR-2 24.5 dB 0.23% P5-305A-PCAPC-1 15.3 dB 2.95%
P4-305AR-2 37.4 dB 0.018% P5-305A-PCAPC-1 34.6 dB 0.034%
P3-305AR-2 43 dB 0.005% P3-305A-FC-1 38.2 dB 0.015%
P1-405AR-2 24.3 dB 0.3715% P1-405B-FC-2 15.01 dB 3.155%
P5-405AR-2 28.1 dB 0.154% P5-405B-PCAPC-1 17.2 dB 1.905%
P4-405AR-2 33.9 dB 0.040% P5-405B-PCAPC-1 26.2 dB 0.2398%
P3-405AR-2 46.8 dB 0.002% P3-405B-FC-2 38.6 dB 0.013%
P1-460AR-2 25.3 dB 0.295% P1-460B-FC-2 16.4 dB 2.2908%
P5-460AR-2 27.6 dB 0.173% P5-460B-PCAPC-1 18.2 dB 1.5135%
P4-460AR-2 33.5 dB 0.044% P5-460B-PCAPC-1 28.6 dB 0.1380%
P3-460AR-2 47.3 dB 0.001% P3-460B-FC-2 38.2 dB 0.015%
P1-630AR-2 24.1 dB 0.3890% P1-630A-FC-2 15.3 dB 2.9512%
P5-630AR-2 24.2 dB 0.3802% P5-630A-PCAPC-2 15.6 dB 2.7542%
P4-630AR-2 43.75 dB 0.0042% P4-630A-PCAPC-2 39.9 dB 0.0102%
P3-630AR-2 61.0 dB 0.0001% P3-630A-FC-2 57.0 dB 0.0002%
P1-780AR-2 22.0 dB 0.6310% P1-780A-FC-2 15.6 dB 2.7542%
P5-780AR-2 30.0 dB 0.1000% P5-780A-PCAPC-2 17.0 dB 1.9953%
P4-780AR-2 47.35 dB 0.0018% P5-780A-PCAPC-2 45.7 dB 0.0027%
P3-780AR-2 56.5 dB 0.0002% P3-780A-FC-2 50.0 dB 0.0010%
P1-980AR-2 27.1 dB 0.1950% P1-980A-FC-2 19.3 dB 1.1749%
P5-980AR-2 27.0 dB 0.1995% P5-980A-PCAPC-2 20.5 dB 0.8913%
P4-980AR-2 51.5 dB 0.0007% P5-980A-PCAPC-2 48.0 dB 0.0016%
P3-980AR-2 57.5 dB 0.0002% P3-980A-FC-2 50.6 dB 0.0009%
P1-SMF28EAR-2 23.6 dB 0.4365% P1-SMF28E-FC-2 14.6 dB 3.4674%
P5-SMF28EAR-2 27.9 dB 0.1622% P5-SMF28E-FC-2 17.3 dB 1.8621%
P4-SMF28EAR-2 39.7 dB 0.0107% P5-SMF28E-FC-2 39.1 dB 0.0123%
P3-SMF28EAR-2 59.5 dB 0.0001% P3-SMF28E-FC-2 58.0 dB 0.0002%
P1-2000AR-2 31.4 dB 0.3890% P1-2000-FC-2 15.6 dB 2.7542%
P5-2000AR-2 32.8 dB 0.0524% P5-2000-PCAPC-1 16.3 dB 2.34422%
P4-2000AR-2 37.1 dB 0.01949% P5-2000-PCAPC-1 30.6 dB 0.0870%
P3-2000AR-2 50 dB 0.001% P3-2000-FC-2 46.3 dB 0.0023%

Laser-Induced Damage in Silica Optical Fibers

The following tutorial details damage mechanisms relevant to unterminated (bare) fiber, terminated optical fiber, and other fiber components from laser light sources. These mechanisms include damage that occurs at the air / glass interface (when free-space coupling or when using connectors) and in the optical fiber itself. A fiber component, such as a bare fiber, patch cable, or fused coupler, may have multiple potential avenues for damage (e.g., connectors, fiber end faces, and the device itself). The maximum power that a fiber can handle will always be limited by the lowest limit of any of these damage mechanisms.

While the damage threshold can be estimated using scaling relations and general rules, absolute damage thresholds in optical fibers are very application dependent and user specific. Users can use this guide to estimate a safe power level that minimizes the risk of damage. Following all appropriate preparation and handling guidelines, users should be able to operate a fiber component up to the specified maximum power level; if no maximum is specified for a component, users should abide by the "practical safe level" described below for safe operation of the component. Factors that can reduce power handling and cause damage to a fiber component include, but are not limited to, misalignment during fiber coupling, contamination of the fiber end face, or imperfections in the fiber itself. For further discussion about an optical fiber’s power handling abilities for a specific application, please contact Thorlabs’ Tech Support.

Power Handling Limitations Imposed by Optical Fiber
Click to Enlarge

Undamaged Fiber End
Power Handling Limitations Imposed by Optical Fiber
Click to Enlarge

Damaged Fiber End

Damage at the Air / Glass Interface

There are several potential damage mechanisms that can occur at the air / glass interface. Light is incident on this interface when free-space coupling or when two fibers are mated using optical connectors. High-intensity light can damage the end face leading to reduced power handling and permanent damage to the fiber. For fibers terminated with optical connectors where the connectors are fixed to the fiber ends using epoxy, the heat generated by high-intensity light can burn the epoxy and leave residues on the fiber facet directly in the beam path.

Estimated Optical Power Densities on Air / Glass Interfacea
Type Theoretical Damage Thresholdb Practical Safe Levelc
CW
(Average Power)
~1 MW/cm2 ~250 kW/cm2
10 ns Pulsed
(Peak Power)
~5 GW/cm2 ~1 GW/cm2
  • All values are specified for unterminated (bare) silica fiber and apply for free space coupling into a clean fiber end face.
  • This is an estimated maximum power density that can be incident on a fiber end face without risking damage. Verification of the performance and reliability of fiber components in the system before operating at high power must be done by the user, as it is highly system dependent.
  • This is the estimated safe optical power density that can be incident on a fiber end face without damaging the fiber under most operating conditions.

Damage Mechanisms on the Bare Fiber End Face

Damage mechanisms on a fiber end face can be modeled similarly to bulk optics, and industry-standard damage thresholds for UV Fused Silica substrates can be applied to silica-based fiber. However, unlike bulk optics, the relevant surface areas and beam diameters involved at the air / glass interface of an optical fiber are very small, particularly for coupling into single mode (SM) fiber. therefore, for a given power density, the power incident on the fiber needs to be lower for a smaller beam diameter.

The table to the right lists two thresholds for optical power densities: a theoretical damage threshold and a "practical safe level". In general, the theoretical damage threshold represents the estimated maximum power density that can be incident on the fiber end face without risking damage with very good fiber end face and coupling conditions. The "practical safe level" power density represents minimal risk of fiber damage. Operating a fiber or component beyond the practical safe level is possible, but users must follow the appropriate handling instructions and verify performance at low powers prior to use.

Calculating the Effective Area for Single Mode and Multimode Fibers
The effective area for single mode (SM) fiber is defined by the mode field diameter (MFD), which is the cross-sectional area through which light propagates in the fiber; this area includes the fiber core and also a portion of the cladding. To achieve good efficiency when coupling into a single mode fiber, the diameter of the input beam must match the MFD of the fiber.

As an example, SM400 single mode fiber has a mode field diameter (MFD) of ~Ø3 µm operating at 400 nm, while the MFD for SMF-28 Ultra single mode fiber operating at 1550 nm is Ø10.5 µm. The effective area for these fibers can be calculated as follows:

SM400 Fiber: Area = Pi x (MFD/2)2 = Pi x (1.5 µm)2 = 7.07 µm= 7.07 x 10-8 cm2

 SMF-28 Ultra Fiber: Area = Pi x (MFD/2)2 = Pi x (5.25 µm)2 = 86.6 µm= 8.66 x 10-7 cm2

To estimate the power level that a fiber facet can handle, the power density is multiplied by the effective area. Please note that this calculation assumes a uniform intensity profile, but most laser beams exhibit a Gaussian-like shape within single mode fiber, resulting in a higher power density at the center of the beam compared to the edges. Therefore, these calculations will slightly overestimate the power corresponding to the damage threshold or the practical safe level. Using the estimated power densities assuming a CW light source, we can determine the corresponding power levels as:

SM400 Fiber: 7.07 x 10-8 cm2 x 1 MW/cm2 = 7.1 x 10-8 MW = 71 mW (Theoretical Damage Threshold)
     7.07 x 10-8 cm2 x 250 kW/cm2 = 1.8 x 10-5 kW = 18 mW (Practical Safe Level)

SMF-28 Ultra Fiber: 8.66 x 10-7 cm2 x 1 MW/cm2 = 8.7 x 10-7 MW = 870 mW (Theoretical Damage Threshold)
           8.66 x 10-7 cm2 x 250 kW/cm2 = 2.1 x 10-4 kW = 210 mW (Practical Safe Level)

The effective area of a multimode (MM) fiber is defined by the core diameter, which is typically far larger than the MFD of an SM fiber. For optimal coupling, Thorlabs recommends focusing a beam to a spot roughly 70 - 80% of the core diameter. The larger effective area of MM fibers lowers the power density on the fiber end face, allowing higher optical powers (typically on the order of kilowatts) to be coupled into multimode fiber without damage.

Damage Mechanisms Related to Ferrule / Connector Termination


Click to Enlarge
Plot showing approximate input power that can be incident on a single mode silica optical fiber with a termination. Each line shows the estimated power level due to a specific damage mechanism. The maximum power handling is limited by the lowest power level from all relevant damage mechanisms (indicated by a solid line).

Fibers terminated with optical connectors have additional power handling considerations. Fiber is typically terminated using epoxy to bond the fiber to a ceramic or steel ferrule. When light is coupled into the fiber through a connector, light that does not enter the core and propagate down the fiber is scattered into the outer layers of the fiber, into the ferrule, and the epoxy used to hold the fiber in the ferrule. If the light is intense enough, it can burn the epoxy, causing it to vaporize and deposit a residue on the face of the connector. This results in localized absorption sites on the fiber end face that reduce coupling efficiency and increase scattering, causing further damage.

For several reasons, epoxy-related damage is dependent on the wavelength. In general, light scatters more strongly at short wavelengths than at longer wavelengths. Misalignment when coupling is also more likely due to the small MFD of short-wavelength SM fiber that also produces more scattered light.

To minimize the risk of burning the epoxy, fiber connectors can be constructed to have an epoxy-free air gap between the optical fiber and ferrule near the fiber end face. Our high-power multimode fiber patch cables use connectors with this design feature.

Determining Power Handling with Multiple Damage Mechanisms

When fiber cables or components have multiple avenues for damage (e.g., fiber patch cables), the maximum power handling is always limited by the lowest damage threshold that is relevant to the fiber component. In general, this represents the highest input power that can be incident on the patch cable end face and not the coupled output power.

As an illustrative example, the graph to the right shows an estimate of the power handling limitations of a single mode fiber patch cable due to damage to the fiber end face and damage via an optical connector. The total input power handling of a terminated fiber at a given wavelength is limited by the lower of the two limitations at any given wavelength (indicated by the solid lines). A single mode fiber operating at around 488 nm is primarily limited by damage to the fiber end face (blue solid line), but fibers operating at 1550 nm are limited by damage to the optical connector (red solid line).

In the case of a multimode fiber, the effective mode area is defined by the core diameter, which is larger than the effective mode area for SM fiber. This results in a lower power density on the fiber end face and allows higher optical powers (on the order of kilowatts) to be coupled into the fiber without damage (not shown in graph). However, the damage limit of the ferrule / connector termination remains unchanged and as a result, the maximum power handling for a multimode fiber is limited by the ferrule and connector termination. 

Please note that these are rough estimates of power levels where damage is very unlikely with proper handling and alignment procedures. It is worth noting that optical fibers are frequently used at power levels above those described here. However, these applications typically require expert users and testing at lower powers first to minimize risk of damage. Even still, optical fiber components should be considered a consumable lab supply if used at high power levels.

Intrinsic Damage Threshold

In addition to damage mechanisms at the air / glass interface, optical fibers also display power handling limitations due to damage mechanisms within the optical fiber itself. These limitations will affect all fiber components as they are intrinsic to the fiber itself. Two categories of damage within the fiber are damage from bend losses and damage from photodarkening. 

Bend Losses
Bend losses occur when a fiber is bent to a point where light traveling in the core is incident on the core/cladding interface at an angle higher than the critical angle, making total internal reflection impossible. Under these circumstances, light escapes the fiber, often in a localized area. The light escaping the fiber typically has a high power density, which burns the fiber coating as well as any surrounding furcation tubing.

A special category of optical fiber, called double-clad fiber, can reduce the risk of bend-loss damage by allowing the fiber’s cladding (2nd layer) to also function as a waveguide in addition to the core. By making the critical angle of the cladding/coating interface higher than the critical angle of the core/clad interface, light that escapes the core is loosely confined within the cladding. It will then leak out over a distance of centimeters or meters instead of at one localized spot within the fiber, minimizing the risk of damage. Thorlabs manufactures and sells 0.22 NA double-clad multimode fiber, which boasts very high, megawatt range power handling.

Photodarkening
A second damage mechanism, called photodarkening or solarization, can occur in fibers used with ultraviolet or short-wavelength visible light, particularly those with germanium-doped cores. Fibers used at these wavelengths will experience increased attenuation over time. The mechanism that causes photodarkening is largely unknown, but several fiber designs have been developed to mitigate it. For example, fibers with a very low hydroxyl ion (OH) content have been found to resist photodarkening and using other dopants, such as fluorine, can also reduce photodarkening.

Even with the above strategies in place, all fibers eventually experience photodarkening when used with UV or short-wavelength light, and thus, fibers used at these wavelengths should be considered consumables.

Preparation and Handling of Optical Fibers

General Cleaning and Operation Guidelines
These general cleaning and operation guidelines are recommended for all fiber optic products. Users should still follow specific guidelines for an individual product as outlined in the support documentation or manual. Damage threshold calculations only apply when all appropriate cleaning and handling procedures are followed.

  1. All light sources should be turned off prior to installing or integrating optical fibers (terminated or bare). This ensures that focused beams of light are not incident on fragile parts of the connector or fiber, which can possibly cause damage.

  2. The power-handling capability of an optical fiber is directly linked to the quality of the fiber/connector end face. Always inspect the fiber end prior to connecting the fiber to an optical system. The fiber end face should be clean and clear of dirt and other contaminants that can cause scattering of coupled light. Bare fiber should be cleaved prior to use and users should inspect the fiber end to ensure a good quality cleave is achieved.

  3. If an optical fiber is to be spliced into the optical system, users should first verify that the splice is of good quality at a low optical power prior to high-power use. Poor splice quality may increase light scattering at the splice interface, which can be a source of fiber damage.

  4. Users should use low power when aligning the system and optimizing coupling; this minimizes exposure of other parts of the fiber (other than the core) to light. Damage from scattered light can occur if a high power beam is focused on the cladding, coating, or connector.

Tips for Using Fiber at Higher Optical Power
Optical fibers and fiber components should generally be operated within safe power level limits, but under ideal conditions (very good optical alignment and very clean optical end faces), the power handling of a fiber component may be increased. Users must verify the performance and stability of a fiber component within their system prior to increasing input or output power and follow all necessary safety and operation instructions. The tips below are useful suggestions when considering increasing optical power in an optical fiber or component.

  1. Splicing a fiber component into a system using a fiber splicer can increase power handling as it minimizes possibility of air/fiber interface damage. Users should follow all appropriate guidelines to prepare and make a high-quality fiber splice. Poor splices can lead to scattering or regions of highly localized heat at the splice interface that can damage the fiber.

  2. After connecting the fiber or component, the system should be tested and aligned using a light source at low power. The system power can be ramped up slowly to the desired output power while periodically verifying all components are properly aligned and that coupling efficiency is not changing with respect to optical launch power.

  3. Bend losses that result from sharply bending a fiber can cause light to leak from the fiber in the stressed area. When operating at high power, the localized heating that can occur when a large amount of light escapes a small localized area (the stressed region) can damage the fiber. Avoid disturbing or accidently bending fibers during operation to minimize bend losses.

  4. Users should always choose the appropriate optical fiber for a given application. For example, large-mode-area fibers are a good alternative to standard single mode fibers in high-power applications as they provide good beam quality with a larger MFD, decreasing the power density on the air/fiber interface.

  5. Step-index silica single mode fibers are normally not used for ultraviolet light or high-peak-power pulsed applications due to the high spatial power densities associated with these applications.


Posted Comments:
s.marschall  (posted 2018-12-03 12:09:27.493)
Are the overall specifications of the patch cable the same as those of the SM-fiber patch cables without coating? Specifically, are the losses when mating the uncoated FC/APC connector to another fiber the same as when using a P3-780A-FC-2?
YLohia  (posted 2018-12-03 09:30:05.0)
Hello, thank you for contacting Thorlabs. The AR coating is designed for minimum reflection for an air-glass interface. If you mate fibers together, the interface is glass-glass, so technically there is no index change and an AR coating is not needed. The AR-coated end should not be mated to a fiber-coupled light source or to another cable via a mating sleeve. Doing so will physically damage the AR coating. FC connectors are in contact with one another when mated and the spring action in the connector keeps the fibers from crushing each other. SMA connectors, however, do not have spring action, so the mating sleeves are designed to always impose some kind of air gap between the fibers. In this case, using AR fibers would be okay.
uqmalmei  (posted 2018-01-08 17:15:44.397)
Would be possible to buy fibres with both ends AR-coated? Cheers, Marcelo.
nbayconich  (posted 2018-02-20 05:18:02.0)
Thank you for contacting Thorlabs. We can provide both ends AR coated. I'll reach out to you directly with more information our custom capabilities.
tmayer  (posted 2015-05-21 09:41:40.857)
Is it possible to get this fiber with a length of 4 or 5 meters?
besembeson  (posted 2015-08-19 08:53:13.0)
Response from Bweh at Thorlabs USA: Yes this is possible. We will followup with you for a quotation.
ilovecrazydog  (posted 2013-09-27 10:01:31.977)
I am concerned about damage threshold of AR coated patch cables, especially in UV to visible range. Do you have any reference value?
tcohen  (posted 2013-10-03 16:19:00.0)
Response from Tim at Thorlabs: The damage of these patch cables should still be limited by the power handling of the fiber itself. 10mW/um^2 would be an approximate threshold for these fibers and so depending on your core size, power handling will vary. As with all damage threshold considerations, avoiding defect precursors such as contamination/scratches is important to achieve this number. With fiber, it is also beneficial to improve your coupling efficiency before raising the power.
user  (posted 2013-05-15 18:03:30.143)
Thorlabs, Would it not make more sense to have the AR end flat polished instead of PC? This is, for me at least, only for fiber to freespace, so the curvature at the AR end only adds spherical aberation to my beam, and contributes nothing of value. Flat polish would be more useful.
tcohen  (posted 2013-05-23 13:38:00.0)
Response from Tim at Thorlabs: Thank you for your feedback. Currently, we use the same FC/PC connectors as our standard patch cables. These are pre-radiused which ensures that when two connectors are mated, the fiber cores are touching, minimizing insertion loss. These cables with pre-radiused FC/PC connectors have been tested to improve RL. We will also look into whether these cables, where the end face is not going to be mated, would be beneficial to have a flat polish. Thank you for sharing your suggestion.
mbakker  (posted 2013-05-08 08:59:21.277)
Would it be possible to have AR at both ends of the fiber as well? Why is this not a standard option?
jlow  (posted 2013-05-08 09:27:00.0)
Response from Jeremy at Thorlabs: The AR coated patch cables are typically used in applications where one end is in physical contact with another fiber. Having an AR coating on that surface would degrade the performance because the AR coating is optimized for fiber/air interface. We can have both ends AR coated for you if needed. We will get in contact with you directly to discuss further about this.
bdada  (posted 2011-10-25 23:37:00.0)
Response from Buki at Thorlabs: Thank you for using our Web Feedback tool. We do not currently offer reflective coatings on our fiber. We will contact you to discuss your application and see how we can be of further assistance.
jikim  (posted 2011-10-22 15:39:50.0)
Could you offer a fiber with 50 % reflection coating instead of AR coating? If you could, I would like to ask you a quotation for a 1 m long fiber patch cable with SMF-28e+, FC/PC (R = 50 %) to FC/APC (no coating) for 1550 nm.
bdada  (posted 2011-09-20 12:57:00.0)
Response from Buki at Thorlabs: Thank you for your feedback. We will act on your suggestion immediately and will provide this service soon. We will contact you with more information shortly.
georg.simmerle  (posted 2011-09-20 13:58:25.0)
Would it be possible to get the AR coating service for SM fibers (SM450 to SM980) as well? Thank you. Georg
user  (posted 2010-08-23 15:36:57.0)
A reply from Jens at Thorlabs: yes, this can be done. We will contact you with price and lead time information.
Adam  (posted 2010-04-16 13:20:01.0)
A response from Adam at THorlabs to carlsonrt: We can offer the fiber you are looking for. I would like to contact you directly to get more information about your application and the exact requirements for this patch cable.
carlsonrt  (posted 2010-04-16 11:19:35.0)
I would like a quote for price and delivery on fiber patchcord of this type, but made with 1550 PMF instead of SMF28 fiber: Qty 2-5 Length: 1 meter 1550-PM fiber One end: FC/PC with 1550 ARC Other end: FC/APC uncoated Thank you
Tyler  (posted 2008-06-26 16:55:25.0)
A response from Tyler at Thorlabs to lance: The operating temperature range of the P1-SMF28-FC-1-15 is -60°C to 85°C. The return loss is wavelength dependent. The reflectivity plot specifies the reflectivity at 1550 nm as 0.22%, which corresponds to a return loss of 26.6dB at 1550nm assuming a fiber to air interface. Since the reflectivity plot is typical, there could be some variation from fiber to fiber. Finally, maximum laser power at 1550nm is not a specification that I can provide. Silica has a damage threshold somewhere around 1MW/cm², which means if the MFD of the fiber is ~10µm it would take less than 1W to damage the fiber.
lance  (posted 2008-06-10 13:52:06.0)
What is the operating temperature range? What is the return loss at 1550 nm? What is the maximum laser power at 1550 nm?

AR-Coated Single Mode Patch Cables for 320 - 430 nm

Item # AR-Coated Connector Uncoated Connector AR Coating AR Coating Reflectivity Jacket
P1-305AR-2 FC/PC (30126C3)a FC/PC (30126C3) Ravg < 1% for 300 - 510 nm Graph FT030-Y
P5-305AR-2 FC/PC (30126C3)a FC/APC (30126A3)
P4-305AR-2 FC/APC (30126A3) FC/PC (30126C3)
P3-305AR-2 FC/APC (30126A3) FC/APC (30126A3)
Fiber
Type
Bare Fiber
Wavelength Range
Cutoff
Wavelength
MFDb Cladding
Diameter
Coating
Diameter
Max Attenuationc NA Length
SM300 320 - 430 nm ≤310 nm 2.0 - 2.4 µm @ 350 nm 125 ± 1.0 µm 245 ± 15 µm ≤70 dB/km @ 350 nm 0.12 - 0.14 2 m
  • The connector used with this patch cable includes a black boot instead of the yellow boot included with the 30126C3. 
  • Mode field diameter is a nominal, calculated value, estimated at operating wavelength(s) using a typical value of NA and cutoff wavelength.
  • Max attenuation data is for unterminated fiber.
Based on your currency / country selection, your order will ship from Newton, New Jersey  
+1 Qty Docs Part Number - Universal Price Available
P1-305AR-2 Support Documentation
P1-305AR-2SM Patch Cable, AR-Coated FC/PC to Uncoated FC/PC, 320 - 430 nm, 2 m
$186.72
Today
P5-305AR-2 Support Documentation
P5-305AR-2SM Patch Cable, AR-Coated FC/PC to Uncoated FC/APC, 320 - 430 nm, 2 m
$193.72
Today
P4-305AR-2 Support Documentation
P4-305AR-2SM Patch Cable, AR-Coated FC/APC to Uncoated FC/PC, 320 - 430 nm, 2 m
$205.39
Today
P3-305AR-2 Support Documentation
P3-305AR-2SM Patch Cable, AR-Coated FC/APC to Uncoated FC/APC, 320 - 430 nm, 2 m
$205.39
Today

AR-Coated Single Mode Patch Cables for 405 - 532 nm

Item # AR-Coated Connector Uncoated Connector AR Coating AR Coating Reflectivity Jacket
P1-405AR-2 FC/PC (30126C3)a FC/PC (30126C3) Ravg < 0.75% for 400 - 700 nm Graph FT030-Y
P5-405AR-2 FC/PC (30126C3)a FC/APC (30126A3)
P4-405AR-2 FC/APC (30126A3) FC/PC (30126C3)
P3-405AR-2 FC/APC (30126A3) FC/APC (30126A3)
Fiber
Type
Bare Fiber
Wavelength Range
Cutoff
Wavelength
MFDb Cladding
Diameter
Coating
Diameter
Max Attenuationc NA Length
SM400 405 - 532 nm 305 - 400  nm 2.5 - 3.4 µm @ 480 nm 125 ± 1.0 µm 245 ± 15 µm ≤50 dB/km @ 430 nm
≤30 dB/km @ 532 nm
0.12 - 0.14 2 m
  • The connector used with this patch cable includes a black boot instead of the yellow boot included with the 30126C3. 
  • Mode field diameter is a nominal, calculated value, estimated at operating wavelength(s) using a typical value of NA and cutoff wavelength.
  • Max attenuation data is for unterminated fiber.
Based on your currency / country selection, your order will ship from Newton, New Jersey  
+1 Qty Docs Part Number - Universal Price Available
P1-405AR-2 Support Documentation
P1-405AR-2SM Patch Cable, AR-Coated FC/PC to Uncoated FC/PC, 405 - 532 nm, 2 m
$178.55
Today
P5-405AR-2 Support Documentation
P5-405AR-2SM Patch Cable, AR-Coated FC/PC to Uncoated FC/APC, 405 - 532 nm, 2 m
$190.22
Today
P4-405AR-2 Support Documentation
P4-405AR-2SM Patch Cable, AR-Coated FC/APC to Uncoated FC/PC, 405 - 532 nm, 2 m
$203.05
Today
P3-405AR-2 Support Documentation
P3-405AR-2SM Patch Cable, AR-Coated FC/APC to Uncoated FC/APC, 405 - 532 nm 2 m
$203.05
Today

AR-Coated Single Mode Patch Cables for 488 - 633 nm

Item # AR-Coated Connector Uncoated Connector AR Coating AR Coating Reflectivity Jacket
P1-460AR-2 FC/PC (30126C3)a FC/PC (30126C3) Ravg < 0.75% for 400 - 700 nm Graph FT030-Y
P5-460AR-2 FC/PC (30126C3)a FC/APC (30126A3)
P4-460AR-2 FC/APC (30126A3) FC/PC (30126C3)
P3-460AR-2 FC/APC (30126A3) FC/APC (30126A3)
Fiber
Type
Bare Fiber
Wavelength Rangeb
Cutoff
Wavelength
MFDc Cladding
Diameter
Coating
Diameter
Max Attenuationd,e NA Length
SM450 488 - 633 nm 350 - 470 nm 2.8 - 4.1 µm @ 488 nm 125 ± 1.0 µm 245 ± 15 µm ≤50 dB/km @ 488 nm 0.10 - 0.14 2 m
  • The connector used with this patch cable includes a black boot instead of the yellow boot included with the 30126C3. 
  • The wavelength range is the spectral region between the cutoff wavelength and the bend edge and represents the region where the fiber transmits the TEM00 mode with low attenuation. For this fiber, the bend edge wavelength is typically 200 nm longer than the cutoff wavelength.
  • Mode field diameter is a nominal, calculated value, estimated at operating wavelength(s) using a typical value of NA and cutoff wavelength.
  • Max attenuation data is for unterminated fiber.
  • Stated attenuation is a worst-case value, quoted for the shortest design wavelength.
Based on your currency / country selection, your order will ship from Newton, New Jersey  
+1 Qty Docs Part Number - Universal Price Available
P1-460AR-2 Support Documentation
P1-460AR-2SM Patch Cable, AR-Coated FC/PC to Uncoated FC/PC, 488 - 633 nm, 2 m
$175.05
Today
P5-460AR-2 Support Documentation
P5-460AR-2SM Patch Cable, AR-Coated FC/PC to Uncoated FC/APC, 488 - 633 nm, 2 m
$182.05
Today
P4-460AR-2 Support Documentation
P4-460AR-2SM Patch Cable, AR-Coated FC/APC to Uncoated FC/PC, 488 - 633 nm, 2 m
$199.55
5-8 Days
P3-460AR-2 Support Documentation
P3-460AR-2SM Patch Cable, AR-Coated FC/APC to Uncoated FC/APC, 488 - 633 nm, 2 m
$199.55
Today

AR-Coated Single Mode Patch Cables for 633 - 780 nm

Item # AR-Coated Connector Uncoated Connector AR Coating AR Coating Reflectivity Jacket
P1-630AR-2 FC/PC (30126C3)a FC/PC (30126C3) Ravg < 0.5% for 500 - 800 nm Graph FT030-Y
P5-630AR-2 FC/PC (30126C3)a FC/APC (30126A3)
P4-630AR-2 FC/APC (30126A3) FC/PC (30126C3)
P3-630AR-2 FC/APC (30126A3) FC/APC (30126A3)
Fiber
Type
Bare Fiber
Wavelength Rangeb
Cutoff
Wavelength
MFDc Cladding
Diameter
Coating
Diameter
Max
Attenuationd
NA Length
SM600 633 - 780 nm 500 - 600 nm 3.6 - 5.3 µm @ 633 nm 125 ± 1.0 µm 245 ± 15 µm ≤15 dB/km 0.10 - 0.14 2 m
  • The connector used with this patch cable includes a black boot instead of the yellow boot included with the 30126C3. 
  • The wavelength range is the spectral region between the cutoff wavelength and the bend edge and represents the region where the fiber transmits the TEM00 mode with low attenuation. For this fiber, the bend edge wavelength is typically 200 nm longer than the cutoff wavelength.
  • Mode field diameter is a nominal, calculated value, estimated at operating wavelength(s) using a typical value of NA and cutoff wavelength.
  • The max attenutation is specified for unterminated fiber.
Based on your currency / country selection, your order will ship from Newton, New Jersey  
+1 Qty Docs Part Number - Universal Price Available
P1-630AR-2 Support Documentation
P1-630AR-2SM Patch Cable, AR-Coated FC/PC to Uncoated FC/PC, 633 - 780 nm, 2 m
$163.38
Today
P5-630AR-2 Support Documentation
P5-630AR-2SM Patch Cable, AR-Coated FC/PC to Uncoated FC/APC, 633 - 780 nm, 2 m
$175.05
Today
P4-630AR-2 Support Documentation
P4-630AR-2SM Patch Cable, AR-Coated FC/APC to Uncoated FC/PC, 633 - 780 nm, 2 m
$184.38
Today
P3-630AR-2 Support Documentation
P3-630AR-2SM Patch Cable, AR-Coated FC/APC to Uncoated FC/APC, 633 - 780 nm, 2 m
$197.22
Today

AR-Coated Single Mode Patch Cables for 780 - 970 nm

Item # AR-Coated Connector Uncoated Connector AR Coating AR Coating Reflectivity Jacket
P1-780AR-2 FC/PC (30126C3)a FC/PC (30126C3) Ravg < 0.5% for 650 - 1050 nm Graph FT030-Y
P5-780AR-2 FC/PC (30126C3)a FC/APC (30126A3)
P4-780AR-2 FC/APC (30126A3) FC/PC (30126C3)
P3-780AR-2 FC/APC (30126A3) FC/APC (30126A3)
Fiber
Type
Bare Fiber
Wavelength Range
Cutoff
Wavelength
MFDb Cladding
Diameter
Coating
Diameter
Max
Attenuationc
NA Length
780HP 780 - 970 nm 730 ± 30 nm 5.0 ± 0.5 µm @ 850 nm 125 ± 1 µm 245 ± 15 µm <3.5 dB/km @ 850 nm 0.13 2 m
  • The connector used with this patch cable includes a black boot instead of the yellow boot included with the 30126C3. 
  • Mode field diameter is a nominal, calculated value, estimated at operating wavelength(s) using a typical value of NA and cutoff wavelength.
  • The max attenutation is specified for unterminated fiber.
Based on your currency / country selection, your order will ship from Newton, New Jersey  
+1 Qty Docs Part Number - Universal Price Available
P1-780AR-2 Support Documentation
P1-780AR-2SM Patch Cable, AR-Coated FC/PC to Uncoated FC/PC, 780 - 970 nm, 2 m
$187.88
Lead Time
P5-780AR-2 Support Documentation
P5-780AR-2SM Patch Cable, AR-Coated FC/PC to Uncoated FC/APC, 780 - 970 nm, 2 m
$200.73
Lead Time
P4-780AR-2 Support Documentation
P4-780AR-2SM Patch Cable, AR-Coated FC/APC to Uncoated FC/PC, 780 - 970 nm, 2 m
$197.22
Today
P3-780AR-2 Support Documentation
P3-780AR-2SM Patch Cable, AR-Coated FC/APC to Uncoated FC/APC, 780 - 970 nm, 2 m
$208.89
Today

AR-Coated Single Mode Patch Cables for 980 - 1250 nm

Item # AR-Coated Connector Uncoated Connector AR Coating AR Coating Reflectivity Jacket
P1-980AR-2 FC/PC (30126C3)a FC/PC (30126C3) Ravg < 0.5% for 850 - 1250 nm Graph FT030-Y
P5-980AR-2 FC/PC (30126C3)a FC/APC (30126A3)
P4-980AR-2 FC/APC (30126A3) FC/PC (30126C3)
P3-980AR-2 FC/APC (30126A3) FC/APC (30126A3)
Fiber
Type
Bare Fiber
Wavelength Range
Cutoff
Wavelength
MFDb Cladding
Diameter
Coating
Diameter
Max
Attenuationc,d
NA Length
SM980-5.8-125 980 - 1550 nm 870 - 970 nm 5.3 - 6.4 µm @ 980 nm 125 ± 1.0 µm 245 ± 15 µm ≤2.0 dB/km 0.13 - 0.15 2 m
  • The connector used with this patch cable includes a black boot instead of the yellow boot included with the 30126C3. 
  • Mode field diameter is a nominal, calculated value, estimated at operating wavelength(s) using a typical value of NA and cutoff wavelength.
  • The max attenutation is specified for unterminated fiber.
  • Attenuation is a worst-case value, quoted for the shortest design wavelength.
Based on your currency / country selection, your order will ship from Newton, New Jersey  
+1 Qty Docs Part Number - Universal Price Available
P1-980AR-2 Support Documentation
P1-980AR-2SM Patch Cable, AR-Coated FC/PC to Uncoated FC/PC, 980 - 1250 nm, 2 m
$161.04
Today
P5-980AR-2 Support Documentation
P5-980AR-2SM Patch Cable, AR-Coated FC/PC to Uncoated FC/APC, 980 - 1250 nm, 2 m
$157.01
Today
P4-980AR-2 Support Documentation
P4-980AR-2SM Patch Cable, AR-Coated FC/APC to Uncoated FC/PC, 980 - 1250 nm, 2 m
$178.55
Today
P3-980AR-2 Support Documentation
P3-980AR-2SM Patch Cable, AR-Coated FC/APC to Uncoated FC/APC, 980 - 1250 nm, 2 m
$190.22
Today

AR-Coated Single Mode Patch Cables for 1260 - 1620 nm

Item # AR-Coated Connector Uncoated Connector AR Coating AR Coating Reflectivity Jacket
P1-SMF28EAR-2 FC/PC (30126C3)a FC/PC (30126C3) Ravg < 0.5% for 1050 - 1620 nm Graph FT030-Y
P5-SMF28EAR-2 FC/PC (30126C3)a FC/APC (30126A3)
P4-SMF28EAR-2 FC/APC (30126A3) FC/PC (30126C3)
P3-SMF28EAR-2 FC/APC (30126A3) FC/APC (30126A3)
Fiber
Type
Bare Fiber
Wavelength Range
Cutoff
Wavelength
MFDb Cladding
Diameter
Coating
Diameter
Max
Attenuationc
NA Length
SMF-28 Ultra 1260 - 1625 nm <1260 nm 9.2 ± 0.4 µm @ 1310 nm
10.4 ± 0.5 µm @ 1550 nm
125 ± 0.7 µm 242 ± 5 µm ≤0.32 dB/km @ 1310 nm
≤0.18 dB/km @ 1550 nm
0.14 2 m
  • The connector used with this patch cable includes a black boot instead of the yellow boot included with the 30126C3. 
  • Mode field diameter is a nominal, calculated value, estimated at operating wavelength(s) using a typical value of NA and cutoff wavelength.
  • The max attenutation is specified for unterminated fiber.
Based on your currency / country selection, your order will ship from Newton, New Jersey  
+1 Qty Docs Part Number - Universal Price Available
P1-SMF28EAR-2 Support Documentation
P1-SMF28EAR-2SM Patch Cable, AR-Coated FC/PC to Uncoated FC/PC, 1260 - 1620 nm, 2 m
$143.54
5-8 Days
P5-SMF28EAR-2 Support Documentation
P5-SMF28EAR-2SM Patch Cable, AR-Coated FC/PC to Uncoated FC/APC, 1260 - 1620 nm, 2 m
$141.10
5-8 Days
P4-SMF28EAR-2 Support Documentation
P4-SMF28EAR-2SM Patch Cable, AR-Coated FC/APC to Uncoated FC/PC, 1260 - 1620 nm, 2 m
$172.71
Today
P3-SMF28EAR-2 Support Documentation
P3-SMF28EAR-2SM Patch Cable, AR-Coated FC/APC to Uncoated FC/APC, 1260 - 1620 nm, 2 m
$184.38
Today

AR-Coated Single Mode Patch Cables for 1700 - 2100 nm

Item # AR-Coated Connector Uncoated Connector AR Coating AR Coating Reflectivity Jacket
P1-2000AR-2 FC/PC (30126C3)a FC/PC (30126C3) Ravg < 0.5% for 1700 - 2100 nm Graph FT030-Y
P5-2000AR-2 FC/PC (30126C3)a FC/APC (30126A3)
P4-2000AR-2 FC/APC (30126A3) FC/PC (30126C3)
P3-2000AR-2 FC/APC (30126A3) FC/APC (30126A3)
Fiber
Type
Bare Fiber
Wavelength Range
Cutoff
Wavelength
MFDc Cladding
Diameter
Coating
Diameter
Typical Attenuationb NA Length
SM2000 1700 - 2300 nm 1750 ± 50 nm 13 ± 1 µm @ 1996 nm 125 ± 1 µm 245 ± 10 µm 20 dB/km (0.02 dB/m) @ 1.9 µm
250 dB/km (0.25 dB/m) @ 2.3 µm
0.12 ± 0.01 2 m
  • The connector used with this patch cable includes a black boot instead of the yellow boot included with the 30126C3. 
  • The attenutation is specified for unterminated fiber.
  • Mode field diameter is a nominal, calculated value, estimated at operating wavelength(s) using a typical value of NA and cutoff wavelength.
Based on your currency / country selection, your order will ship from Newton, New Jersey  
+1 Qty Docs Part Number - Universal Price Available
P1-2000AR-2 Support Documentation
P1-2000AR-2SM Patch Cable, AR-Coated FC/PC to Uncoated FC/PC, 1700 - 2100 nm, 2 m
$190.22
Today
P5-2000AR-2 Support Documentation
P5-2000AR-2SM Patch Cable, AR-Coated FC/PC to Uncoated FC/APC, 1700 - 2100 nm, 2 m
$190.22
Today
P4-2000AR-2 Support Documentation
P4-2000AR-2SM Patch Cable, AR-Coated FC/APC to Uncoated FC/PC, 1700 - 2100 nm, 2 m
$214.72
Today
P3-2000AR-2 Support Documentation
P3-2000AR-2SM Patch Cable, AR-Coated FC/APC to Uncoated FC/APC, 1700 - 2100 nm, 2 m
$214.72
Today
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