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Protected Silver Mirrors


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Protected Silver Mirrors

Optical Coating Information
Optic Cleaning Tutorial

Features

  • High Reflectance in Visible and NIR Regions
  • Protective SiO2 Overcoat Prevents Oxidation
  • Laser Damage Threshold: 3 J/cm2 (1064 nm, 10 ns, 10 Hz, Ø1.000 mm)
  • Available Round, Square, or in Packages of 10 Rounds

Silver coated mirrors offer the highest reflection in the visible-NIR spectrum (450 nm - 2 µm, Ravg >97.5%) of any metallic mirror. While excellent in the visible, silver mirrors also offer high reflection in the IR (2 - 20 µm, Ravg > 96%). Please see the Graphs tab (above) for reflectance curves. In order to protect them from oxidation, these mirrors have a durable SiO2 overcoat with an approximate thickness of 100 nm. Though the overcoat helps to protect silver from tarnishing, high humidity environments should be avoided. We offer these mirrors in packs of ten at a 10% discount over the regular price.

Due to their high reflectivity and near-zero group delay over the 450 nm - 20 µm range, these mirrors are well suited for use with femtosecond pulsed lasers. For our full selection of optics for ultrafast applications, please see the Ultrafast Optics tab.

The shaded regions in the graphs denote the ranges over which we guarantee the specified reflectance. Please note that the reflectance outside of these bands is typical and can vary from lot to lot, especially in out-of-band regions where the reflectance is fluctuating or sloped.

Protected Silver at Near-Normal Incident Angle
Click to Enlarge

Excel Spreadsheet with Raw Data for Protected Silver
Protected Silver at 45 Degree Incident Angle
Click to Enlarge

Excel Spreadsheet with Raw Data for Protected Silver

Thorlabs offers a wide selection of optics optimized for use with femtosecond laser pulses. Please see below for more information.

Damage Threshold Specifications
Laser TypeDamage Threshold
Pulsed3 J/cm2 (1064 nm, 10 ns, 10 Hz, Ø1.000 mm)
CWa1750 W/cm (1.064 µm, Ø0.044 mm),
1500 W/cm (10.6 µm, Ø0.339 mm)
  • The power density of your beam should be calculated in terms of W/cm. For an explanation of why the linear power density provides the best metric for long pulse and CW sources, please see the "Continuous Wave and Long-Pulse Lasers" section below.

Damage Threshold Data for Thorlabs' Protected Silver Mirrors

The specifications to the right are measured data for Thorlabs' protected silver mirrors. Damage threshold specifications are constant for all Thorlabs' protected silver mirrors, regardless of the size or shape of the mirror.

 

Laser Induced Damage Threshold Tutorial

This following is a general overview of how laser induced damage thresholds are measured and how the values may be utilized in determining the appropriateness of an optic for a given application. When choosing optics, it is important to understand the Laser Induced Damage Threshold (LIDT) of the optics being used. The LIDT for an optic greatly depends on the type of laser you are using. Continuous wave (CW) lasers typically cause damage from thermal effects (absorption either in the coating or in the substrate). Pulsed lasers, on the other hand, often strip electrons from the lattice structure of an optic before causing thermal damage. Note that the guideline presented here assumes room temperature operation and optics in new condition (i.e., within scratch-dig spec, surface free of contamination, etc.). Because dust or other particles on the surface of an optic can cause damage at lower thresholds, we recommend keeping surfaces clean and free of debris. For more information on cleaning optics, please see our Optics Cleaning tutorial.

Testing Method

Thorlabs' LIDT testing is done in compliance with ISO/DIS11254 specifications. A standard 1-on-1 testing regime is performed to test the damage threshold.

First, a low-power/energy beam is directed to the optic under test. The optic is exposed in 10 locations to this laser beam for a set duration of time (CW) or number of pulses (prf specified). After exposure, the optic is examined by a microscope (~100X magnification) for any visible damage. The number of locations that are damaged at a particular power/energy level is recorded. Next, the power/energy is either increased or decreased and the optic is exposed at 10 new locations. This process is repeated until damage is observed. The damage threshold is then assigned to be the highest power/energy that the optic can withstand without causing damage. A histogram such as that below represents the testing of one BB1-E02 mirror.

LIDT metallic mirror
The photograph above is a protected aluminum-coated mirror after LIDT testing. In this particular test, it handled 0.43 J/cm2 (1064 nm, 10 ns pulse, 10 Hz, Ø1.000 mm) before damage.
LIDT BB1-E02
Example Test Data
Fluence# of Tested LocationsLocations with DamageLocations Without Damage
1.50 J/cm210010
1.75 J/cm210010
2.00 J/cm210010
2.25 J/cm21019
3.00 J/cm21019
5.00 J/cm21091

According to the test, the damage threshold of the mirror was 2.00 J/cm2 (532 nm, 10 ns pulse, 10 Hz, Ø0.803 mm). Please keep in mind that it is only representative of one coating run and that Thorlabs' specified damage thresholds account for coating variances.

Continuous Wave and Long-Pulse Lasers

When an optic is damaged by a continuous wave (CW) laser, it is usually due to the melting of the surface as a result of absorbing the laser's energy or damage to the optical coating (antireflection) [1]. Pulsed lasers with pulse lengths longer than 1 µs can be treated as CW lasers for LIDT discussions. Additionally, when pulse lengths are between 1 ns and 1 µs, LIDT can occur either because of absorption or a dielectric breakdown (must check both CW and pulsed LIDT). Absorption is either due to an intrinsic property of the optic or due to surface irregularities; thus LIDT values are only valid for optics meeting or exceeding the surface quality specifications given by a manufacturer. While many optics can handle high power CW lasers, cemented (e.g., achromatic doublets) or highly absorptive (e.g., ND filters) optics tend to have lower CW damage thresholds. These lower thresholds are due to absorption or scattering in the cement or metal coating.

Linear Power Density Scaling

LIDT in linear power density vs. pulse length and spot size. For long pulses to CW, linear power density becomes a constant with spot size. This graph was obtained from [1].

Intensity Distribution

Pulsed lasers with high pulse repetition frequencies (PRF) may behave similarly to CW beams. Unfortunately, this is highly dependent on factors such as absorption and thermal diffusivity, so there is no reliable method for determining when a high PRF laser will damage an optic due to thermal effects. For beams with a large PRF both the average and peak powers must be compared to the equivalent CW power. Additionally, for highly transparent materials, there is little to no drop in the LIDT with increasing PRF.

In order to use the specified CW damage threshold of an optic, it is necessary to know the following:

  1. Wavelength of your laser
  2. Linear power density of your beam (total power divided by 1/e2 spot size)
  3. Beam diameter of your beam (1/e2)
  4. Approximate intensity profile of your beam (e.g., Gaussian)

The power density of your beam should be calculated in terms of W/cm. The graph to the right shows why the linear power density provides the best metric for long pulse and CW sources. Under these conditions, linear power density scales independently of spot size; one does not need to compute an adjusted LIDT to adjust for changes in spot size. This calculation assumes a uniform beam intensity profile. You must now consider hotspots in the beam or other nonuniform intensity profiles and roughly calculate a maximum power density. For reference, a Gaussian beam typically has a maximum power density that is twice that of the uniform beam (see lower right).

Now compare the maximum power density to that which is specified as the LIDT for the optic. If the optic was tested at a wavelength other than your operating wavelength, the damage threshold must be scaled appropriately. A good rule of thumb is that the damage threshold has a linear relationship with wavelength such that as you move to shorter wavelengths, the damage threshold decreases (i.e., a LIDT of 10 W/cm at 1310 nm scales to 5 W/cm at 655 nm). While this rule of thumb provides a general trend, it is not a quantitative analysis of LIDT vs wavelength. In CW applications, for instance, damage scales more strongly with absorption in the coating and substrate, which does not necessarily scale well with wavelength. While the above procedure provides a good rule of thumb for LIDT values, please contact Tech Support if your wavelength is different from the specified LIDT wavelength. If your power density is less than the adjusted LIDT of the optic, then the optic should work for your application.

Please note that we have a buffer built in between the specified damage thresholds online and the tests which we have done, which accommodates variation between batches. Upon request, we can provide individual test information and a testing certificate. The damage analysis will be carried out on a similar optic (customer's optic will not be damaged). Testing may result in additional costs or lead times. Contact Tech Support for more information.

Pulsed Lasers

As previously stated, pulsed lasers typically induce a different type of damage to the optic than CW lasers. Pulsed lasers often do not heat the optic enough to damage it; instead, pulsed lasers produce strong electric fields capable of inducing dielectric breakdown in the material. Unfortunately, it can be very difficult to compare the LIDT specification of an optic to your laser. There are multiple regimes in which a pulsed laser can damage an optic and this is based on the laser's pulse length. The highlighted columns in the table below outline the pulse lengths that our specified LIDT values are relevant for.

Pulses shorter than 10-9 s cannot be compared to our specified LIDT values with much reliability. In this ultra-short-pulse regime various mechanics, such as multiphoton-avalanche ionization, take over as the predominate damage mechanism [2]. In contrast, pulses between 10-7 s and 10-4 s may cause damage to an optic either because of dielectric breakdown or thermal effects. This means that both CW and pulsed damage thresholds must be compared to the laser beam to determine whether the optic is suitable for your application.

Pulse Durationt < 10-9 s10-9 < t < 10-7 s10-7 < t < 10-4 st > 10-4 s
Damage MechanismAvalanche IonizationDielectric BreakdownDielectric Breakdown or ThermalThermal
Relevant Damage SpecificationN/APulsedPulsed and CWCW

When comparing an LIDT specified for a pulsed laser to your laser, it is essential to know the following:

Energy Density Scaling

LIDT in energy density vs. pulse length and spot size. For short pulses, energy density becomes a constant with spot size. This graph was obtained from [1].

  1. Wavelength of your laser
  2. Energy density of your beam (total energy divided by 1/e2 area)
  3. Pulse length of your laser
  4. Pulse repetition frequency (prf) of your laser
  5. Beam diameter of your laser (1/e2 )
  6. Approximate intensity profile of your beam (e.g., Gaussian)

The energy density of your beam should be calculated in terms of J/cm2. The graph to the right shows why the energy density provides the best metric for short pulse sources. Under these conditions, energy density scales independently of spot size, one does not need to compute an adjusted LIDT to adjust for changes in spot size. This calculation assumes a uniform beam intensity profile. You must now adjust this energy density to account for hotspots or other nonuniform intensity profiles and roughly calculate a maximum energy density. For reference a Gaussian beam typically has a maximum power density that is twice that of the 1/e2 beam.

Now compare the maximum energy density to that which is specified as the LIDT for the optic. If the optic was tested at a wavelength other than your operating wavelength, the damage threshold must be scaled appropriately [3]. A good rule of thumb is that the damage threshold has an inverse square root relationship with wavelength such that as you move to shorter wavelengths, the damage threshold decreases (i.e., a LIDT of 1 J/cm2 at 1064 nm scales to 0.7 J/cm2 at 532 nm):

Pulse Wavelength Scaling

You now have a wavelength-adjusted energy density, which you will use in the following step.

Beam diameter is also important to know when comparing damage thresholds. While the LIDT, when expressed in units of J/cm2, scales independently of spot size; large beam sizes are more likely to illuminate a larger number of defects which can lead to greater variances in the LIDT [4]. For data presented here, a <1 mm beam size was used to measure the LIDT. For beams sizes greater than 5 mm, the LIDT (J/cm2) will not scale independently of beam diameter due to the larger size beam exposing more defects.

The pulse length must now be compensated for. The longer the pulse duration, the more energy the optic can handle. For pulse widths between 1 - 100 ns, an approximation is as follows:

Pulse Length Scaling

Use this formula to calculate the Adjusted LIDT for an optic based on your pulse length. If your maximum energy density is less than this adjusted LIDT maximum energy density, then the optic should be suitable for your application. Keep in mind that this calculation is only used for pulses between 10-9 s and 10-7 s. For pulses between 10-7 s and 10-4 s, the CW LIDT must also be checked before deeming the optic appropriate for your application.

Please note that we have a buffer built in between the specified damage thresholds online and the tests which we have done, which accommodates variation between batches. Upon request, we can provide individual test information and a testing certificate. Contact Tech Support for more information.


[1] R. M. Wood, Optics and Laser Tech. 29, 517 (1997).
[2] Roger M. Wood, Laser-Induced Damage of Optical Materials (Institute of Physics Publishing, Philadelphia, PA, 2003).
[3] C. W. Carr et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 127402 (2003).
[4] N. Bloembergen, Appl. Opt. 12, 661 (1973).

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Posted Comments:
Poster: adr5109
Posted Date: 2014-01-17 18:40:02.097
Can some information be given regarding how this mirror coating holds up to femtosecond pulses? The damage threshold isn't very useful, especially, if it's advertised as having nearly 0 GVD, which would basically be for fs systems. I read in the 400/800 mirrors feedback the response, "the coating is designed to withstand 1.5W of 800nm ultrafast pulses with durations as short as 50fs and 300mW of 400nm ultrafast pulses with durations as short as 50fs, at a minimum diameter of 1.2mm" Do you have similar knowledge for silver? gold? Thanks a lot, Adam
Poster: jlow
Posted Date: 2014-01-27 02:09:32.0
Response from Jeremy at Thorlabs: We do not have a spec on the damage threshold for femtosecond pulses. However, we have had feedback from a customer who used our protected metal mirrors without any problem with a 2.5 mJ laser (800 nm, 1 kHz rep rate, 60fs FWHM).
Poster: jlow
Posted Date: 2013-06-18 11:46:00.0
Response from Jeremy at Thorlabs: We have an optics cleaning tutorial at http://www.thorlabs.com/tutorials.cfm?tabID=26066 which details the cleaning procedure for typical optics. I would recommend first blowing off the dust from the surface and then do the drop and drag method afterwards.
Poster: julia.maerk
Posted Date: 2013-06-14 15:13:02.02
Hello Thorlab, could you give me some advice/send me some information on how best to clean the protected silver mirror surface? Kind regards, Julia
Poster: tcohen
Posted Date: 2012-10-15 12:07:00.0
Response from Tim at Thorlabs: Thank you very much for your feedback! We are further investigating polarization phase shift of our mirrors to be able to publish our results. Before publication can be done we will need to evaluate this in the production process and current inventory. As this may take some time, I will contact you with the theoretical data directly.
Poster: ke.claytor
Posted Date: 2012-10-12 09:34:08.91
Very interested in how this mirror (and your other coatings) effects polarization. Can you please make phase shift data available online? I am interested in phase shifts in the range 600 - 900 nm at 45 AOI, if you wish to send me the data directly.
Poster: sharrell
Posted Date: 2012-09-24 10:23:00.0
Response from Sean at Thorlabs: Thank you for your feedback! I will send you the newest data for our silver coating directly. In addition, I will update the silver coating curve plot across our website and add a link to download this data to all of the appropriate pages today.
Poster: tcohen
Posted Date: 2012-08-16 14:28:00.0
Response from Tim at Thorlabs: Thank you for contacting us. I have sent the requested data for your review.
Poster: julielutti
Posted Date: 2012-08-16 11:54:14.0
Hello, I would also like to have the phase shift data for those mirrors at 45degrees AOI - 600-900nm spectral region. Thanks
Poster: tcohen
Posted Date: 2012-07-12 11:42:00.0
Response from Tim at Thorlabs: In order to clean your mirror, please first blow off the optic to remove any contaminants. After this, please lightly moisten a lintless wipe, such as a lens tissue or Webril Wipe, with an optical grade solvent, such as acetone. At this point you can employ the drop and drag method or applicator method as detailed in our Optics Cleaning Tutorial at http://www.thorlabs.com/tutorials.cfm?tabID=26066. This tutorial discusses recommended handling and cleaning methods in depth. If you have any questions on any specific cleaning methods, please contact us at techsupport@thorlabs.com.
Poster:
Posted Date: 2012-07-11 09:54:23.0
how to clean fingerprint on the protected silver mirror? thanks
Poster: tcohen
Posted Date: 2012-07-05 11:30:00.0
Response from Tim at Thorlabs: These have a parallelism of <3 arcmin. For convenience, this and further specifications can be found on the “Specs” tab on this page.
Poster: salerno.anthony92
Posted Date: 2012-07-04 14:58:08.0
Hello there. I was wondering exactly how parallel are the front and back surfaces of the mirrors? Cheers.
Poster: tcohen
Posted Date: 2012-06-28 11:08:00.0
Response from Tim at Thorlabs: Thank you for your interest in our protected silver mirrors! I have contacted you with phase shift data.
Poster: ph
Posted Date: 2012-06-28 11:43:24.0
Hi, how does the protected silver mirror (45° AOI) affect polarization of a linearly polarized CO2 laser beam (@10.6 µm)? Do you have phase shift data or other data for this?
Poster: tcohen
Posted Date: 2012-06-01 09:27:00.0
Response from Tim at Thorlabs: Thank you for your feedback! I have contacted you directly with the data.
Poster: jfu
Posted Date: 2012-05-31 13:33:48.0
I am particularly interested in phase shift data for waverlength of 1064nm Thanks
Poster: jfu
Posted Date: 2012-05-31 11:53:23.0
Could you send me the data of phase shift for protected silver coated mirror? for both p and s polarization?
Poster: bdada
Posted Date: 2012-01-23 08:46:00.0
Response from Buki at Thorlabs: Thank you for using our feedback forum. There is a SiO2 overcoat with a typical thickness of 100nm.
Poster: p.j.j.mangeol
Posted Date: 2012-01-06 08:27:21.0
Dear Sir or Madam, I would need to know how thick is the protective layer. For my application it would be great if it was smaller than 50nm or so. Do you have an number? What are the physicochemical properties of the surface: does it respond like glass? Best regards, PM
Poster: bdada
Posted Date: 2011-08-22 16:27:00.0
Response from Buki at Thorlabs: Thank you for your feedback. The coating is SiO2. We will correct the mistake on our website.
Poster:
Posted Date: 2011-08-19 14:16:09.0
Is there a reason why SiO coating is used instead of more common SiO2?
Poster: jjurado
Posted Date: 2011-08-17 09:45:00.0
Response from Javier at Thorlabs to matthias.raunhardt: The damage threshold is mainly dictated by the peak power of the laser used. As a guideline, lasers with pulse duration in the range of 10 ns to 10 us can cause damage by dielectric breakdown and by thermal absorption.
Poster: matthias.raunhardt
Posted Date: 2011-08-10 08:21:06.0
Hello. According to your specifications, damage breakdown of the silver coating appears at 3 J/cm2 at 1064 nm, 10 ns, 10 Hz, Ø1.000 mm. Is this damage caused by average or by peak power? In our application just the breakdown because of average power is important. Can you state on that? Thank you very much. Regards.
Poster: chienchunglee
Posted Date: 2011-06-09 17:10:35.0
How thick is the SiO overcoat?
Poster: jjurado
Posted Date: 2011-02-16 17:05:00.0
Response from Javier at Thorlabs to mbrodeur: Thank you for submitting your request. We currently do not offer optic components in ZERODUR substrate. However, we may be able to offer these mirrors as part of a special production. I will contact you directly to get more details.
Poster: mbrodeur
Posted Date: 2011-02-16 09:49:36.0
looking for VNIR mirror I did not see 30mm dia or square spectral response 400-1000nm prefer silver coating,and appropriate protective coatings zeodur material
Poster: jjurado
Posted Date: 2011-02-03 11:48:00.0
Response from Javier at Thorlabs to achmyro: Thank you very much for contacting us. The ratio between cross section/diameter that allows us to maintain 1/10 wave surface flatness is 4:1. In this case we can go down to a thickness of 3.2 mm. If we modify an already coated mirror by grinding it down to a smaller thickness, it is very likely that the grinding process will introduce stress to the part, reducing the flatness from 1/10 wave to 1/4 wave. I will contact you directly to discuss your application.
Poster: achmyro
Posted Date: 2011-02-03 16:24:44.0
Is it possible to get a rectangular mirror like PFSQ05-03-P01 on a thinner substrate while still maintaining high surface flatness? What will be the minimal thickness?
Poster: tor
Posted Date: 2010-11-11 17:25:07.0
Response from Tor at Thorlabs to Nick: Thank you for your inquiry. I am locating the reflectivity data for both of these coatings along your wavelength of interest; once its available, I will share it with you. In the meantime, the following reflectivity can be expected from the protected aluminum mirrors: Ravg > 90% from 450 nm - 2 µm, Ravg > 95% from 2 - 20 µm; from the protected silver mirrors, Ravg > 97.5% from 450 nm - 2 µm, Ravg > 96% from 2 - 20 µm can be expected.
Poster: nick
Posted Date: 2010-11-10 12:57:16.0
Can you please confirm the reflectance percentage from ~1 to 10um for both protected silver and protected aluminum of your products?
Poster: Thorlabs
Posted Date: 2010-08-13 17:05:39.0
Response from Javier at Thorlabs to cdurfee: Thank you for your feedback. I will send you data of the phase shift generated by these silver coated mirrors.
Poster: cdurfee
Posted Date: 2010-08-12 11:41:51.0
Are there measurements or calculations about what the phase shift is vs wavelength? We have a lot of these mirrors, but Im concerned that the wavelength-dependent phase shift affects our ultrafast laser pulses centered at 800nm.
Poster: Adam
Posted Date: 2010-05-05 14:41:31.0
A response from Adam at Thorlabs to sebastian: Currently, we do not have CW damage threshold specifications for our metallic mirrors. We will be sending these out for testing and expect to have information back by the end of this month.
Poster: sebastian.beyer
Posted Date: 2010-05-04 14:01:46.0
You list these mirrors Laser Damage Threshold for pulsed lasers. Can you give specifications for the use with cw lasers as well?
Poster: Greg
Posted Date: 2010-04-28 15:54:17.0
A response from Greg at Thorlabs to gsh: I have added reflectivity data for our other metallic mirrors. Links for this data can be found next to the reflectivity graphs. Thank you for giving us feedback on our website!
Poster: Adam
Posted Date: 2010-04-28 12:55:28.0
A response from Adam to gsh: We can certainly add this data to the website. We will make sure we add these graphs. In the meantime, I will email you the data you are looking for.
Poster: gsh
Posted Date: 2010-04-28 10:39:06.0
You have the raw data for the gold mirror reflectivity at 0 deg and 45 degrees, but you dont have the data for silver or aluminium listed. Are these data available?
Poster: acable
Posted Date: 2008-02-06 09:19:45.0
It would be nice to have measured reflectivity plots included on the Overview tab for all the metalic mirrors as a quick reference tool. I would suggest that the curve start at the 90% points so as to provide a clear picture of the performance of the mirror. It would also be nice to have plots from a couple of different lots provided on the Graphs tab to show the variability of the reflectivity. At the bottom of this tab i would also suggest that you show the plots of the other metallic mirrors with links to the various types that you sell. Very often i have a broadband source and need to pick from the various metallic coatings and i find myself hopping around to piece the data together. I would guess many visitors would have the requirements. If possible i would also find it useful to have links embedded in the Overview tab that would allow me to hop around to the various metallic mirrors.
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Round Protected Silver Mirrors
Item # PF03-03-P01 PF05-03-P01 PF10-03-P01 PF20-03-P01 PF30-03-P01 PF40-03-P01
Diameter 0.276" (7.0 mm) 0.5" (12.7 mm) 1" (25.4 mm) 2" (50.8 mm) 3" (76.2 mm) 4" (101.6 mm)
Thickness 0.079" (2.0 mm) 0.236" (6.0 mm) 0.236" (6.0 mm) 0.472" (12.0 mm) 0.8" (19.1 mm) 0.8" (19.1 mm)
Substrate Fused Silica
Surface Flatness λ/10 @ 633 nm
Surface Quality 40-20 Scratch-Dig
Parallelism <3 arcmin
Clear Aperture >90% of Diameter
Damage Threshold (Pulse) 3 J/cm2 @ 1064 nm, 10 ns, 10 Hz, Ø1.000 mm
Damage Threshold (CW)a 1750 W/cm at 1.064 µm, Ø0.044 mm
1500 W/cm at 10.6 µm, Ø0.339 mm
  • The power density of your beam should be calculated in terms of W/cm. For an explanation of why the linear power density provides the best metric for long pulse and CW sources, please see the Damage Thresholds tab.
Based on your currency / country selection, your order will ship from Newton, New Jersey  
+1 Qty Docs Part Number - Universal/Imperial Price Available / Ships
PF03-03-P01 Support Documentation
PF03-03-P01 Ø0.28" (Ø7 mm) Protected Silver Mirror, 0.08" (2.0 mm) Thick
$26.00
Today
PF05-03-P01 Support Documentation
PF05-03-P01 Ø1/2" (Ø12.7 mm) Protected Silver Mirror, 0.24" (6.0 mm) Thick
$30.60
Today
PF10-03-P01 Support Documentation
PF10-03-P01 Ø1" (Ø25.4 mm) Protected Silver Mirror, 0.24" (6.0 mm) Thick
$50.00
Today
PF20-03-P01 Support Documentation
PF20-03-P01 Ø2" (Ø50.8 mm) Protected Silver Mirror, 0.47" (12.0 mm) Thick
$101.00
Today
PF30-03-P01 Support Documentation
PF30-03-P01 Customer Inspired! Ø3" (Ø76.2 mm) Protected Silver Mirror, 0.8" (19.1 mm) Thick
$356.00
Today
PF40-03-P01 Support Documentation
PF40-03-P01 Customer Inspired! Ø4" (Ø101.6 mm) Protected Silver Mirror, 0.8" (19.1 mm) Thick
$526.00
Today
Square Protected Silver Mirrors
Item # PFSQ05-03-P01 PFSQ10-03-P01 PFSQ20-03-P01
Dimensions 0.5" x 0.5" (12.7 x 12.7 mm) 1" x 1" (25.4 x 25.4 mm) 2" x 2" (50.8 x 50.8 mm)
Thickness 0.24" (6 mm)
Substrate UV Fused Silica
Surface Flatness λ/10 @ 633 nm ?/8 @ 633 nm
Surface Quality 40-20 Scratch-Dig
Parallelism ≤3 arcmin
Clear Aperture >90% of Dimension
Damage Threshold (Pulse) 3.0 J/cm2 @ 1064 nm, 10 ns, 10 Hz, Ø1.000 mm
Damage Threshold (CW)a 1750 W/cm at 1.064 µm, Ø0.044 mm
1500 W/cm at 10.6 µm, Ø0.339 mm
  • The power density of your beam should be calculated in terms of W/cm. For an explanation of why the linear power density provides the best metric for long pulse and CW sources, please see the Damage Thresholds tab.
Based on your currency / country selection, your order will ship from Newton, New Jersey  
+1 Qty Docs Part Number - Universal/Imperial Price Available / Ships
PFSQ05-03-P01 Support Documentation
PFSQ05-03-P01 1/2" x 1/2" (12.7 x 12.7 mm) Protected Silver Mirror, 0.24" (6 mm) Thick
$30.60
Today
PFSQ10-03-P01 Support Documentation
PFSQ10-03-P01 1" x 1" (25.4 x 25.4 mm) Protected Silver Mirror, 0.24" (6 mm) Thick
$51.00
Today
PFSQ20-03-P01 Support Documentation
PFSQ20-03-P01 2" x 2" (50.8 x 50.8 mm) Protected Silver Mirror, 0.24" (6 mm) Thick
$111.00
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Packages of 10 Protected Silver Mirrors
Item # Mirror Diameter Thickness Quantity
PF05-03-P01-10 PF05-03-P01 1/2" (12.7 mm) 0.236" (6.0 mm) 10
PF10-03-P01-10 PF10-03-P01 1.0" (25.4 mm) 0.236" (6.0 mm) 10
PF20-03-P01-10 PF20-03-P01 2.0" (50.8 mm) 0.472" (12.0 mm) 10
Based on your currency / country selection, your order will ship from Newton, New Jersey  
+1 Qty Docs Part Number - Universal/Imperial Price Available / Ships
PF05-03-P01-10 Support Documentation
PF05-03-P01-10 10 Pack of Ø1/2" (Ø12.7 mm) Protected Silver Mirrors
$267.40
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PF10-03-P01-10 Support Documentation
PF10-03-P01-10 10 Pack of Ø1" (Ø25.4 mm) Protected Silver Mirrors
$451.00
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PF20-03-P01-10 Support Documentation
PF20-03-P01-10 10 Pack of Ø2" (Ø50.8 mm) Protected Silver Mirrors
$901.00
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