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Non-Polarizing Cube Beamsplitters (400 - 700 nm)


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Non-Polarizing Cube Beamsplitters (400 - 700 nm)

BS127CAM Beamsplitter Adapter Mounted in Cage Cube
Click to Enlarge

12.7 mm Beamsplitter Cube Mounted in the CM1-4ER Compact Cage Cube Using the BS127CAM Beamsplitter Adapter
Beamsplitter Cube
Cube Beamsplitter Diagram (Coating and Cement Layer Not to Scale)
Non-Polarizing Cube Beamsplitters
Visible (400 - 700 nm) Beamsplitters
NIR (700 - 1100 nm) Beamsplitters
IR (1100 - 1600 nm) Beamsplitters
Mounted Cube Beamsplitters

Features

  • Broadband AR-Coated Faces for 400 - 700 nm
  • Broadband Beamsplitter Coating on Internal Diagonal Surface
  • 1" (25.4 mm) Cubes with 10:90, 30:70, 50:50, 70:30, or 90:10 (R:T) Split Ratio
  • 50:50 Cubes are Also Available in 5 mm, 10 mm, 1/2" (12.7 mm), or 20 mm Sizes
  • N-BK7 Substrate

Thorlabs' non-polarizing beamsplitter cubes are offered here with broadband AR and beamsplitter coatings designed for 400 - 700 nm. These cubes provide a 10:90, 30:70, 50:50, 70:30, or 90:10 split ratio that is nearly independent of the polarization of the incident light (within 15%).

Each cube is fabricated from N-BK7 and designed for minimal beam offset. A single reflecting surface also avoids ghost images. The dielectric beamsplitter coating is applied to the hypotenuse of one of the two prisms that make up the cube. Cement is used to bind the two prism halves together. In order to achieve the desired split ratio, the light must enter through one of the faces of the beamsplitter-coated prism, which is indicated by a dot on all sizes except the 1" cubes (refer to the diagram to the right). The 1" cubes are engraved with arrows indicating a preferred direction of light propagation.

Our 1" beamsplitter cubes can be mounted directly using a compact cage cube, while our other sizes require a beamsplitter adapter (see image in the upper right-hand corner of this tab). Alternatively, we offer mounted 1" non-polarizing beamsplitter cubes. They are mounted inside 30 mm cage compatible cubes, each of which features four SM1-threaded (1.035"-40) access ports. Additionally, Thorlabs offers pellicle beamsplitters (cube mounted and ring mounted) and plate beamsplitters. For a direct comparison of the performance of our non-polarizing beamsplitter cube, plate, and pellicle at 633 nm, see the Lab Facts tab.

Item #Split Ratio (R:T)Size
BS02510:901" (25.4 mm) Cube
BS01930:701" (25.4 mm) Cube
BS007a50:505 mm Cube
BS01010 mm Cube
BS0041/2" (12.7 mm) Cube
BS01620 mm Cube
BS0131" (25.4 mm) Cube
BS02270:301" (25.4 mm) Cube
BS02890:101" (25.4 mm) Cube
General Specifications
Wavelength Range 400 - 700 nm
AR Coating (All Four Surfaces) Ravg < 0.5% at 0° AOI
from 400 - 700 nm
Damage Threshold (50:50 Cubes Only)Pulse: 0.25 J/cm2 (532 nm, 10 ns, 10 Hz, Ø0.341 mm)
CW: 150 W/cm (532 nm, Ø0.042 mm)
Material N-BK7
Dimensional Tolerance +0.0/-0.2 mm
Surface Flatness (@ 633 nm) λ/10
Wavefront Distortion (@ 633 nm) <λ/4
Max Transmitted Beam Deviation <5 arcmin
Reflected Beam Deviation 90° ± 5 arcmin
Clear Aperture >80% of Entrance Face
Split Ratio Tolerance <15% over Entire Wavelength Range
|Ts-Tp| < 15% and |Rs-Rp| < 15%
Surface Quality 40-20 Scratch-Dig

Thorlabs Lab Fact: Beamsplitter Package Matters

We present laboratory measurements of the polarization angle, split ratio, and total throughput power of a beam transmitted through Thorlabs plate, cube, and pellicle beamsplitters. While all non-polarizing beamsplitters function similarly, the exact performance is different for different types of beamsplitter. Each type of beamsplitter contains its own advantages and disadvantages compared to other types of beamsplitters. Appropriate choice of beamsplitter is essential to sensitive experimental systems. We present a complete analysis and comparison of optical parameters for three common types of non-polarizing beamsplitters.

For our experiment we used the HRS015 stabilized HeNe as the light source for our investigation. A linear polarizer is used to set the laser beam's polarization axis to 45° in order to provide equal S- and P-polarized light incident on the beamsplitter. The beamsplitter under investigation was then placed in the beampath, and its split beams directed to appropriate detectors. The total power though the optic, polarization states, split ratios, and angle of incidence effects were investigated under this configuration.

The plots below summarize the measured results for all three types of beamsplitters. From these graphs the performance of each optic can be easily compared to one another. The bottom left plot summarizes the results for the total power throughput for each optic. The total power throughput is measured as the fraction of input power. While the plate and pellicle beamsplitters perform rather similarly, the cube shows signs of absorption inside the optic. Additionally, this plot shows the relative insensitivity of throughput power to angle of incidence. The bottom middle graph summarizes the results for the output polarization angle for each optic. The cube shows the most similar polarization angles between the reflected and transmitted beams, with the plate producing the largest difference in polarization between beams. The bottom right plot summarizes the results for the split ratio, as a fraction of input power, for the beamsplitters. Here it can be shown that the plate beamsplitter demonstrates the most ideal for 50/50 power splitting. For details on the experimental setup employed and the results summarized here, please click here.

Legend for Beam Diagrams

Reflected Beam: reflected

Transmitted Beam: Transmitted Beam (Green)

Beamsplitter Selection Guide

Thorlabs offers five main types of beamsplitters: Pellicle, Cube, Plate, Economy, and Polka Dot. Each type has distinct advantages and disadvantages.

 

Pellicle Beamsplitter

Pellicle Beamsplitters - Pellicle beamsplitters are the best choice when dispersion must be kept to a minimum. They virtually eliminate multiple reflections commonly associated with thicker glass beamsplitters, thus preventing ghosting. In addition, unlike plate beamsplitters, there is a negligible effect on the propagation axis of the transmitted beam with respect to the incident beam.

Pellicle beamsplitters have two disadvantages: They exhibit sinusodial oscillations in the splitting ratio as a function of wavelength, due to thin film interference effects. Click Here for more details. They are also extremely delicate. Since they are fabricated by stretching a nitrocellulose membrane over a flat metal frame, the beamsplitter cannot be touched without destroying the optic. Thorlabs offers pellicle beamsplitters mounted in metal rings for use in kinematic mounts as well as 30 mm cage cube-mounted pellicles.

 

Polarizing Beamsplitting Cube
Nonpolarizing Beamsplititng Cube

Beamsplitting Cubes
Thorlabs’ beamsplitter cubes are composed of two right-angled prisms. A dielectric coating, which is capable of reflecting and transmitting a portion of the incident beam, is applied to the hypotenuse surface. Since there is only one reflecting surface, this design inherently avoids ghost images, which sometimes occur with plate-type beamsplitters. Antireflection coatings are available on the entrance and exit faces of certain models to minimize back reflections. As well as providing a cost-effective solution, another advantage of the beamsplitting cube is the minimal shift it causes to the path of the transmitted beam. Thorlabs offers both polarizing and nonpolarizing beamsplitting cubes, in mounted and unmounted configurations. Mounted beamsplitters are available that are compatible with our 16 mm cage systems as well as our 30 mm cage systems.

Polarizing Beamsplitters - Thorlabs’ polarizing plate and cube beamsplitters split randomly polarized beams into two orthogonal, linearly polarized components (S and P), as shown in the diagram to the right. S-polarized light is reflected at a 90° angle with respect to the incident beam while p-polarized light is transmitted. Polarizing beamsplitters are useful in applications where the two polarization components are to be analyzed or used simultaneously. Thorlabs offers broadband 16 mm cage cube-mounted, broadband 30 mm cage cube-mounted, and broadband unmounted polarizing beamsplitter cubes, as well as laser line 30 mm cage cube-mounted and laser line unmounted cubes. Additionally, Thorlabs offers wire grid polarizing beamsplitters which have a larger Angle of Incidence and work with uncollimated light. For applications requiring higher power, we also offer high-power polarizing beamsplitting cubes.

Non-Polarizing Beamsplitting Cubes - These cubes provide a 50:50 splitting ratio that is nearly independent of the polarization of the incident light. The low polarization dependence of the metallic-dielectric coating allows the transmission and reflection for s- and p-polarization states to be within 10% of each other. These beamsplitters are particularly useful with randomly polarized lasers and are specifically designed for applications in which polarization effects must be minimized. Thorlabs offers 16 mm cage cube-mounted, 30 mm cage cube-mounted, and unmounted beamsplitter cubes.

 

Plate Beamsplitters

Plate Beamsplitters - Thorlabs' plate beamsplitters are optimized for an incidence angle of 45° and feature a dielectric coating on the front surface for long-term stability. To help reduce unwanted interference effects (e.g., ghost images) caused by the interaction of light reflected from the front and back surfaces of the optic, a wedge has been added to the round versions of these beamsplitters. Dispersion, ghosting, and shifting of the beam may all be potential problems, however. These are the best choice for a general-purpose beamsplitter. Thorlabs offers both polarizing and nonpolarizing plate beamsplitters.

 

Economy Beamsplitters

Economy Beamsplitters - These are the most cost effective of all the beamsplitter types. Thorlabs' economy beamsplitters, which have an exposed oxide coating on one side and are uncoated on the other side, are designed to have either a 50:50 or 30:70 splitting ratio throughout the visible spectrum (450 - 650 nm) when used with unpolarized light incident at 45°.

Please note that the Fresnel reflections off of the uncoated back surface of these economy beamsplitters can lead to interference effects in the reflected beam. For applications sensitive to these effects, consider using a beamsplitting cube or a pellicle beamsplitter.

 

Polka Dot Beamsplitters - This type of beamsplitter consists of a glass substrate with a vacuum-deposited reflective coating that is applied over an array of apertures, giving the beamsplitter a "polka dot" appearance. Half of the incident beam is reflected from the coating, and half of the beam is transmitted through the uncoated portion of the substrate.

Polka Dot Beamsplitter

Polka dot beamsplitters are useful over a wide wavelength range and are negligibly angle sensitive, which makes them ideal for splitting the energy emitted from a radiant source. These are not recommended for imaging applications, such as interferometry, as the polka dot pattern will affect the image.

Damage Threshold Specificationsa
Laser TypeDamage Threshold
Pulsed0.25 J/cm2 (532 nm, 10 ns, 10 Hz, Ø0.341 mm)
CWb150 W/cm (532 nm, Ø0.042 mm)
  • These values only apply to the 50:50 cube beamsplitters sold on this page. The others have not been tested.
  • The power density of your beam should be calculated in terms of W/cm. For an explanation of why the linear power density provides the best metric for long pulse and CW sources, please see the "Continuous Wave and Long-Pulse Lasers" section below.

Damage Threshold Data for Thorlabs' Non-Polarizing Cube Beamsplitters

The specifications to the right are measured data for Thorlabs' 50:50 non-polarizing cube beamsplitters with a wavelength range from 400 to 700 nm. Damage threshold specifications are constant for all 50:50 cubes, regardless of the size of the beamsplitter. Please note that we do not have damage threshold data currently available for the cubes on this page that offer other splitting ratios.

 

Laser Induced Damage Threshold Tutorial

This following is a general overview of how laser induced damage thresholds are measured and how the values may be utilized in determining the appropriateness of an optic for a given application. When choosing optics, it is important to understand the Laser Induced Damage Threshold (LIDT) of the optics being used. The LIDT for an optic greatly depends on the type of laser you are using. Continuous wave (CW) lasers typically cause damage from thermal effects (absorption either in the coating or in the substrate). Pulsed lasers, on the other hand, often strip electrons from the lattice structure of an optic before causing thermal damage. Note that the guideline presented here assumes room temperature operation and optics in new condition (i.e., within scratch-dig spec, surface free of contamination, etc.). Because dust or other particles on the surface of an optic can cause damage at lower thresholds, we recommend keeping surfaces clean and free of debris. For more information on cleaning optics, please see our Optics Cleaning tutorial.

Testing Method

Thorlabs' LIDT testing is done in compliance with ISO/DIS11254 specifications. A standard 1-on-1 testing regime is performed to test the damage threshold.

First, a low-power/energy beam is directed to the optic under test. The optic is exposed in 10 locations to this laser beam for a set duration of time (CW) or number of pulses (prf specified). After exposure, the optic is examined by a microscope (~100X magnification) for any visible damage. The number of locations that are damaged at a particular power/energy level is recorded. Next, the power/energy is either increased or decreased and the optic is exposed at 10 new locations. This process is repeated until damage is observed. The damage threshold is then assigned to be the highest power/energy that the optic can withstand without causing damage. A histogram such as that below represents the testing of one BB1-E02 mirror.

LIDT metallic mirror
The photograph above is a protected aluminum-coated mirror after LIDT testing. In this particular test, it handled 0.43 J/cm2 (1064 nm, 10 ns pulse, 10 Hz, Ø1.000 mm) before damage.
LIDT BB1-E02
Example Test Data
Fluence# of Tested LocationsLocations with DamageLocations Without Damage
1.50 J/cm210010
1.75 J/cm210010
2.00 J/cm210010
2.25 J/cm21019
3.00 J/cm21019
5.00 J/cm21091

According to the test, the damage threshold of the mirror was 2.00 J/cm2 (532 nm, 10 ns pulse, 10 Hz, Ø0.803 mm). Please keep in mind that it is only representative of one coating run and that Thorlabs' specified damage thresholds account for coating variances.

Continuous Wave and Long-Pulse Lasers

When an optic is damaged by a continuous wave (CW) laser, it is usually due to the melting of the surface as a result of absorbing the laser's energy or damage to the optical coating (antireflection) [1]. Pulsed lasers with pulse lengths longer than 1 µs can be treated as CW lasers for LIDT discussions. Additionally, when pulse lengths are between 1 ns and 1 µs, LIDT can occur either because of absorption or a dielectric breakdown (must check both CW and pulsed LIDT). Absorption is either due to an intrinsic property of the optic or due to surface irregularities; thus LIDT values are only valid for optics meeting or exceeding the surface quality specifications given by a manufacturer. While many optics can handle high power CW lasers, cemented (e.g., achromatic doublets) or highly absorptive (e.g., ND filters) optics tend to have lower CW damage thresholds. These lower thresholds are due to absorption or scattering in the cement or metal coating.

Linear Power Density Scaling

LIDT in linear power density vs. pulse length and spot size. For long pulses to CW, linear power density becomes a constant with spot size. This graph was obtained from [1].

Intensity Distribution

Pulsed lasers with high pulse repetition frequencies (PRF) may behave similarly to CW beams. Unfortunately, this is highly dependent on factors such as absorption and thermal diffusivity, so there is no reliable method for determining when a high PRF laser will damage an optic due to thermal effects. For beams with a large PRF both the average and peak powers must be compared to the equivalent CW power. Additionally, for highly transparent materials, there is little to no drop in the LIDT with increasing PRF.

In order to use the specified CW damage threshold of an optic, it is necessary to know the following:

  1. Wavelength of your laser
  2. Linear power density of your beam (total power divided by 1/e2 spot size)
  3. Beam diameter of your beam (1/e2)
  4. Approximate intensity profile of your beam (e.g., Gaussian)

The power density of your beam should be calculated in terms of W/cm. The graph to the right shows why the linear power density provides the best metric for long pulse and CW sources. Under these conditions, linear power density scales independently of spot size; one does not need to compute an adjusted LIDT to adjust for changes in spot size. This calculation assumes a uniform beam intensity profile. You must now consider hotspots in the beam or other nonuniform intensity profiles and roughly calculate a maximum power density. For reference, a Gaussian beam typically has a maximum power density that is twice that of the uniform beam (see lower right).

Now compare the maximum power density to that which is specified as the LIDT for the optic. If the optic was tested at a wavelength other than your operating wavelength, the damage threshold must be scaled appropriately. A good rule of thumb is that the damage threshold has a linear relationship with wavelength such that as you move to shorter wavelengths, the damage threshold decreases (i.e., a LIDT of 10 W/cm at 1310 nm scales to 5 W/cm at 655 nm). While this rule of thumb provides a general trend, it is not a quantitative analysis of LIDT vs wavelength. In CW applications, for instance, damage scales more strongly with absorption in the coating and substrate, which does not necessarily scale well with wavelength. While the above procedure provides a good rule of thumb for LIDT values, please contact Tech Support if your wavelength is different from the specified LIDT wavelength. If your power density is less than the adjusted LIDT of the optic, then the optic should work for your application.

Please note that we have a buffer built in between the specified damage thresholds online and the tests which we have done, which accommodates variation between batches. Upon request, we can provide individual test information and a testing certificate. The damage analysis will be carried out on a similar optic (customer's optic will not be damaged). Testing may result in additional costs or lead times. Contact Tech Support for more information.

Pulsed Lasers

As previously stated, pulsed lasers typically induce a different type of damage to the optic than CW lasers. Pulsed lasers often do not heat the optic enough to damage it; instead, pulsed lasers produce strong electric fields capable of inducing dielectric breakdown in the material. Unfortunately, it can be very difficult to compare the LIDT specification of an optic to your laser. There are multiple regimes in which a pulsed laser can damage an optic and this is based on the laser's pulse length. The highlighted columns in the table below outline the pulse lengths that our specified LIDT values are relevant for.

Pulses shorter than 10-9 s cannot be compared to our specified LIDT values with much reliability. In this ultra-short-pulse regime various mechanics, such as multiphoton-avalanche ionization, take over as the predominate damage mechanism [2]. In contrast, pulses between 10-7 s and 10-4 s may cause damage to an optic either because of dielectric breakdown or thermal effects. This means that both CW and pulsed damage thresholds must be compared to the laser beam to determine whether the optic is suitable for your application.

Pulse Durationt < 10-9 s10-9 < t < 10-7 s10-7 < t < 10-4 st > 10-4 s
Damage MechanismAvalanche IonizationDielectric BreakdownDielectric Breakdown or ThermalThermal
Relevant Damage SpecificationN/APulsedPulsed and CWCW

When comparing an LIDT specified for a pulsed laser to your laser, it is essential to know the following:

Energy Density Scaling

LIDT in energy density vs. pulse length and spot size. For short pulses, energy density becomes a constant with spot size. This graph was obtained from [1].

  1. Wavelength of your laser
  2. Energy density of your beam (total energy divided by 1/e2 area)
  3. Pulse length of your laser
  4. Pulse repetition frequency (prf) of your laser
  5. Beam diameter of your laser (1/e2 )
  6. Approximate intensity profile of your beam (e.g., Gaussian)

The energy density of your beam should be calculated in terms of J/cm2. The graph to the right shows why the energy density provides the best metric for short pulse sources. Under these conditions, energy density scales independently of spot size, one does not need to compute an adjusted LIDT to adjust for changes in spot size. This calculation assumes a uniform beam intensity profile. You must now adjust this energy density to account for hotspots or other nonuniform intensity profiles and roughly calculate a maximum energy density. For reference a Gaussian beam typically has a maximum power density that is twice that of the 1/e2 beam.

Now compare the maximum energy density to that which is specified as the LIDT for the optic. If the optic was tested at a wavelength other than your operating wavelength, the damage threshold must be scaled appropriately [3]. A good rule of thumb is that the damage threshold has an inverse square root relationship with wavelength such that as you move to shorter wavelengths, the damage threshold decreases (i.e., a LIDT of 1 J/cm2 at 1064 nm scales to 0.7 J/cm2 at 532 nm):

Pulse Wavelength Scaling

You now have a wavelength-adjusted energy density, which you will use in the following step.

Beam diameter is also important to know when comparing damage thresholds. While the LIDT, when expressed in units of J/cm2, scales independently of spot size; large beam sizes are more likely to illuminate a larger number of defects which can lead to greater variances in the LIDT [4]. For data presented here, a <1 mm beam size was used to measure the LIDT. For beams sizes greater than 5 mm, the LIDT (J/cm2) will not scale independently of beam diameter due to the larger size beam exposing more defects.

The pulse length must now be compensated for. The longer the pulse duration, the more energy the optic can handle. For pulse widths between 1 - 100 ns, an approximation is as follows:

Pulse Length Scaling

Use this formula to calculate the Adjusted LIDT for an optic based on your pulse length. If your maximum energy density is less than this adjusted LIDT maximum energy density, then the optic should be suitable for your application. Keep in mind that this calculation is only used for pulses between 10-9 s and 10-7 s. For pulses between 10-7 s and 10-4 s, the CW LIDT must also be checked before deeming the optic appropriate for your application.

Please note that we have a buffer built in between the specified damage thresholds online and the tests which we have done, which accommodates variation between batches. Upon request, we can provide individual test information and a testing certificate. Contact Tech Support for more information.


[1] R. M. Wood, Optics and Laser Tech. 29, 517 (1997).
[2] Roger M. Wood, Laser-Induced Damage of Optical Materials (Institute of Physics Publishing, Philadelphia, PA, 2003).
[3] C. W. Carr et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 127402 (2003).
[4] N. Bloembergen, Appl. Opt. 12, 661 (1973).

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Posted Comments:
Poster: besembeson
Posted Date: 2014-10-09 01:24:33.0
Response from Bweh at Thorlabs. We recently acquired the proper accessories to measure these in our spectrometer so I will provide this to you by email.
Poster: limht
Posted Date: 2014-10-04 00:35:59.21
For BS013 as well as other cube BS, only transmission is provided, not reflection. Both of which are needed in my case. Can Thorlabs provide the reflection vs wavelength data as well, just like the case of pellicle BS (avoided as it is fragile)? I cannot let reflection be (1 - transmission) as the absorption and scattering in a cube BS is significant (~7% as stated in the % Power Throughput in the "Lab Facts" tab) to me. It is only reasonable that both reflection and transmission data are provided for all BS types. Thank you.
Poster: jose.garcia
Posted Date: 2014-03-05 08:49:32.9
Hello, Could I have the experimental values of the plots for BS025 and BS028? Could be for s, p and non-polarized light? Thanks.
Poster: myanakas
Posted Date: 2014-03-05 01:16:18.0
Response from Mike at Thorlabs: Thank you for your feedback. We are currently in the process of adding the raw data files for all of our non-polarizing beamsplitters to the website. I have contacted you via email with the data files for the BS025 and BS028 cube beamsplitters.
Poster: tcohen
Posted Date: 2013-11-21 11:42:27.0
Response from Tim at Thorlabs: There is generally some difference on reversal as the reflected beam will be on the optical cement side where more absorption and scattering will occur (as opposed to first incident on the beamsplitter side). This will change your split ratio. I’ve contacted you via email so we can continue this discussion.
Poster: philipp.alt
Posted Date: 2013-11-14 11:45:31.013
How would the split ratio be if the light propagetes not in the recommended way? For example: How is the division ratio when the light incident on the upper surface and not on the marked left one? Would the reflection still be 10%?
Poster: cdaly
Posted Date: 2013-11-07 01:51:49.0
Response from Chris at Thorlabs: Thank you for your inquiry. Unfortunately we have not tested the damage threshold for the 70:30. My initial thoughts are the limiting factor will likely be the epoxy and this would mean the damage threshold would be the same. However, we'd like to have a more definitive answer to provide you, so I will try to have this tested in the coming weeks and added to the specifications provided on the web. We will send this to you directly as soon as possible as well.
Poster: h.aguiar
Posted Date: 2013-10-24 10:23:25.803
In your webpage it is quoted "Damage Threshold (Tested for 50:50 Cubes Only): 300 W/cm" for CW lasers. Is the damage threshold of the 70:30 (and 30:70) also the same? Thanks in advance!
Poster: tcohen
Posted Date: 2013-08-01 10:34:00.0
Response from Tim at Thorlabs: Thank you for contacting us. The specifications with tolerances can be found in the drawing. These numbers are not typical and I will contact you to discuss the measurement setup and order so we can diagnose the problem.
Poster: fredericklie
Posted Date: 2013-08-01 16:09:12.547
last month I bought Beamsplitter 50:50 (BS013) and HeNe Laser (HNL150L). I try to measure the power using power meter, and I got the transmission power only 32.9% and the reflection power only 8.69% from the BS013 (input uses HNL150L). so is it normal? because I expect the transmission 50% and reflection 50%. Thank you.
Poster: tcohen
Posted Date: 2012-07-10 10:28:00.0
Response from Tim at Thorlabs: Thank you for your interest in our BS010! We can provide many custom optics, and a member of our Germany office will contact you directly to discuss this quote with you.
Poster: m.wiko
Posted Date: 2012-07-09 19:22:02.0
We would like to buy non-polarizing cube beamsplitters (BS010 in particular) without the antireflective coating. Is that possible and if yes, what would the estimated cost and the time for delivery to Germany be?
Poster: tcohen
Posted Date: 2012-06-11 10:40:00.0
Response from Tim at Thorlabs: Although we cannot reveal the exact layers of the beamsplitter coating, we would be more than happy to work with you to provide any of the specifications that you may be trying to derive from this information. I will contact you directly to provide more information.
Poster: hailuluo
Posted Date: 2012-06-07 05:59:01.0
We are using the beamsplitters (25.4mm at 632.8nm wavelength). Please tell us the detailed parameters of the thickness and the refractive index of BS coating and cement layer,respectively.
Poster: tcohen
Posted Date: 2012-04-17 18:20:00.0
Response from Tim at Thorlabs: As our optics team has been working on other projects and offering new products, this product is not ready for release. I am discussing your interest with our optics department and will contact you with more details.
Poster: sarah.esther.goldberg
Posted Date: 2012-04-17 04:02:11.0
regarding: "Response from Javier at Thorlabs to natalia.denisenko: The reason why the light polarized at 45 degrees undergoes a change in the polarization is because the beamsplitter coating introduces a phase delay, causing the output polarization to become elliptical. We are currently looking into offering polarization independent/preserving beamsplitters. I will gladly inform you about the progress of this product." can you provide phase shifts for p and s components, for rays passing through and being deflected by the beamsplitter? has there been any progress with the polarization-maintaining idea?
Poster: tcohen
Posted Date: 2012-04-05 18:13:00.0
Response from Tim at Thorlabs: Thank you for your feedback! The tolerance on the reflected beam exiting the cube is currently +/- 20 arcmin of 90 degrees. I am discussing your feedback with our production team to see if there is a way we can tighten up tolerance or offer, as you suggest, tip/tilt control. As a note, we do offer tip/tilt control via post mounting with our KM100B(KM200B) and PM3(PM4). Thank you again for your feedback so that we may continue to improve our products!
Poster:
Posted Date: 2012-03-29 17:20:35.0
I've ordered several of the Cube Mounted models, and while I really like the idea, the tolerances on the mounting aren't great. Usually the beam ends up tilted a small fraction of a degree above or below the axis of the incoming beam. This makes them problematic in large systems, since the beam deflection can become excessive. Would you consider making a mounted version with tip/tilt controls or at least some other way to compensate for the finite mechanical tolerances?
Poster: bdada
Posted Date: 2012-01-31 23:54:00.0
Response from Buki at Thorlabs: We do not have a tested value for the CW damage threshold but you can use 10 W/cm^2 as a guideline. We post the pulsed damage threshold on our website because it is a tested value. Please contact us at techsupport@thorlabs.com if you have further questions.
Poster: bdada
Posted Date: 2012-01-27 01:20:00.0
Response from Buki at Thorlabs: As an update on the last post, we are currently developing the polarization independent beamsplitters and they should be released soon. We will provide more updates as we get closer to the release date.
Poster: bdada
Posted Date: 2012-01-12 21:10:00.0
Response from Buki at Thorlabs: Thank you for using our online feedback tool. The CM1-BS013 is a mounted version of the BS013 so it will introduce a phase delay similar to what the previous poster experienced. We will contact you with an update on the polarization preserving beamsplitter.
Poster:
Posted Date: 2012-01-10 16:20:17.0
Tried to find Max CW/Average Power Density for these optics, did i miss it.
Poster: achmyro
Posted Date: 2012-01-10 15:36:14.0
Your wrote previously on this feedback page (in response to the question from natalia.denisenko) that THORlabs is looking into offering polarization independent/preserving beamsplitters. Can you offer such polarization-insensitive beamsplitting cubes? CM1-BS013 is marketed as "Cube-Mounted Polarization-Insensitive Beamsplitter". Is it really Polarization-Insensitive, meaning that linear polarization at 45º will not deteriorate upon reflection from the cube? Or is it a 'normal' BS013, which will introduce a phase delay and polarization distortion?
Poster: bdada
Posted Date: 2011-07-27 19:15:00.0
Response from Buki at Thorlabs: We have contacted you with a graph and will look into making this information available on our website.
Poster: mlaroton
Posted Date: 2011-07-26 14:09:09.0
Can you give specs on splitting ratio for your non-polarizing beamsplitters BS014 (700-1000nm range), at the specific wavelength of 810 nanometers? (catalog says 15% tolerance but I understand that this number is for the entire range). Thanks, Miguel.
Poster: jjurado
Posted Date: 2011-06-17 08:53:00.0
Response from Javier at Thorlabs to Tomer: Thank you very much for contacting us. The CW damage threshold of 10 W/cm^2 is offered as a guideline, so we post the pulsed damage threshold instead, since this is the value that has been actually tested. Also, the laser induced damage on this optic beamsplitter initiates on the cement bond between the two prisms that make up the cube. Please contact us at techsupport@thorlabs.com if you have any further questions.
Poster:
Posted Date: 2011-06-13 09:02:15.0
An earlier response gave the CW damage threshold. Can you please update it in the specs tab? also, where does the damage occur? is it a damage to the AR coating or to the dielectric beam splitting coating? Thanks, Tomer
Poster: Laurie
Posted Date: 2011-02-02 11:14:29.0
Response from Laurie at Thorlabs to the unidentified poster from 1-28-2011: Thank you for your comments concerning the "x" on these optics. It is a natural question that we should have addressed in our web presentation. You will find that we have updated the overview tab of this presentation to prevent confusion for other customers who are likely wondering the same thing. Thanks for the taking the time to help us improve the information we provide, and I apologize for the inconvenience we may have caused by not just having the information readily available.
Poster: Thorlabs
Posted Date: 2011-01-31 10:45:03.0
Response from Javier at Thorlabs to last poster: Thank you for submitting your inquiry. The "x" mark indicates the recommended entrance direction of the beamsplitter. Please contact techsupport@thorlabs.com if you have any further questions.
Poster:
Posted Date: 2011-01-28 21:58:40.0
I am using these beamsplitters. all of them have a "x" mark on one side of the splitter. What is the significance of this "x" mark for combining laser beams for a mach zehnder interferometer.
Poster: tor
Posted Date: 2011-01-10 18:14:21.0
Response from Tor at Thorlabs to stripa3: Thank you for your interest in our BS013. Currently, we do not have any damage threshold information for these optics in the ultrafast regime.
Poster: stripa3
Posted Date: 2011-01-09 20:43:23.0
What is the damage threshold for this beamsplitter if it is used with pulsed femtosecond laser with a few tens of megahertz repetition rate.
Poster: Thorlabs
Posted Date: 2010-09-23 09:29:25.0
Response from Javier at Thorlabs to yuj210: the AR coating on the BS cube beamsplitters yields a reflectivity of < 0.5% at each surface, which minimizes interference effects resulting from secondary reflection as the transmitted ray exits the beamsplitter. Unfortunately, it is not easy to avoid this effect altogether with a cube; it would be necessary to use a wedged surface. I would recommend using a plate beamsplitter such as the BSW10 (http://www.thorlabs.com/NewGroupPage9.cfm?ObjectGroup_ID=4807). The back surface of this BS is wedged at 30 arcmin, so it eliminates interference effects.
Poster: yuj210
Posted Date: 2010-09-23 02:00:44.0
Regarding AR coating in a cube BS, I can understand that beam reflected on a entrance surface is suppressed when beam enters into BS. My question is what about reflectance occurring when beam escape the BS. At the end face, there are also transmitting(escaping BS) beam and reflecting beam just like the entrance face. Now Im concerning the beam reflected at the end face of the BS. At 4th face of the BS (1st is beam entering, 2nd and 3rd are beams escaping) I think Ive got interference of two beams reflected from each end faces, and I have to eliminate this interference.
Poster: Thorlabs
Posted Date: 2010-09-08 16:06:08.0
Response from Javier at Thorlabs to guillaume.lepert07: The AR coatings on the BS series cubes have an average reflectivity of < 0.5% over their specified band.
Poster: guillaume.lepert07
Posted Date: 2010-09-02 13:20:19.0
I am worried about etalon interference within the BS (we currently have such a problem with a plate BS). What is the residual reflectivity of the AR coating? (wavelength of interest 780 nm). Thanks.
Poster: jjurado
Posted Date: 2010-06-01 16:00:30.0
Response from Javier at Thorlabs to natalia.denisenko: The reason why the light polarized at 45 degrees undergoes a change in the polarization is because the beamsplitter coating introduces a phase delay, causing the output polarization to become elliptical. We are currently looking into offering polarization independent/preserving beamsplitters. I will gladly inform you about the progress of this product.
Poster: natalia.denisenko
Posted Date: 2010-05-28 16:31:34.0
We use a BS014 to combine beams at 850 nm, both linearly polarized: one polarized at 90º and the other at 45º. We observe that the 45º polarized incident beam becomes elliptically polarized at both cube outputs, which is undesirable in our setup. What could be the reason for this behaviour? Furthermore, we would like to know the refraction index of the internal diagonal surface coating, and if this index is lower than that of the N-BK7.
Poster: makarov
Posted Date: 2010-05-24 14:32:09.0
How large is internal loss in BS014 beamsplitter cube? I.e., when summing the two output beam powers together, how much of the input beam power is lost?
Poster: klee
Posted Date: 2009-07-07 12:11:27.0
A response from Ken at Thorlabs to roland.thuenauer: The damage threshold is 10 W/cm^2 for CW, 10 mJ/cm^2 for 10 ns pulsed laser.
Poster: roland.thuenauer
Posted Date: 2009-07-07 07:50:28.0
I would like to know the damage threshold (W/cm^2) of the non-polarizing beam splitter cubes BS007 & BS010.
Poster: TechnicalMarketing
Posted Date: 2007-09-11 14:41:24.0
Thank you for your presentation feedback. Our ongoing dialog with our customers is extremely important to us. We have tried to incorporate your comments into the presentation of this product. If you have further feedback, please feel free to make additional comments.
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10:90 (R:T) Cube Beamsplitter
10:90 Cube Beamsplitter Transmission
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  • 10:90 (R:T) Split Ratio
  • 1" (25.4 mm) Cube
  • N-BK7 Substrate

The shaded region in the graph to the right indicates the specified operating wavelength range.

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BS025 Support Documentation
BS025 10:90 (R:T) Non-Polarizing Beamsplitter Cube 400-700 nm, 1"
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30:70 (R:T) Cube Beamsplitter
30:70 Cube Beamsplitter Transmission
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  • 30:70 (R:T) Split Ratio
  • 1" (25.4 mm) Cube
  • N-BK7 Substrate

The shaded region in the graph to the right indicates the specified operating wavelength range.

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BS019 Support Documentation
BS019 Customer Inspired! 30:70 (R:T) Non-Polarizing Beamsplitter Cube, 400-700 nm, 1"
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50:50 Cube Beamsplitters
50:50 Cube Beamsplitter Transmission
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Click Here for a Raw Data File with an Extended Range of 300 - 900 nm
  • 50:50 (R:T) Split Ratio
  • 5 mm, 10 mm, 1/2" (12.7 mm), 20 mm, and 1" (25.4 mm) Cubes Available
  • Damage Threshold:
    • Pulse: 0.25 J/cm2 (532 nm, 10 ns, 10 Hz, Ø0.341 mm)
    • CW: 150 W/cm (532 nm, Ø0.042 mm)
  • N-BK7 Substrate

The shaded region in the graph to the right indicates the specified operating wavelength range.

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BS007 Support Documentation
BS007 50:50 Non-Polarizing Beamsplitter Cube, 400 - 700 nm, 5 mm
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BS010 Support Documentation
BS010 50:50 Non-Polarizing Beamsplitter Cube, 400 - 700 nm, 10 mm
$144.00
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BS004 Support Documentation
BS004 Customer Inspired! 50:50 Non-Polarizing Beamsplitter Cube, 400 - 700 nm, 1/2"
$156.00
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BS016 Support Documentation
BS016 50:50 Non-Polarizing Beamsplitter Cube, 400 - 700 nm, 20 mm
$172.00
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BS013 Support Documentation
BS013 50:50 Non-Polarizing Beamsplitter Cube, 400 - 700 nm, 1"
$196.80
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70:30 (R:T) Cube Beamsplitter
70:30 Cube Beamsplitter Transmission
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Click Here for the Raw Data File
  • 70:30 (R:T) Split Ratio
  • 1" (25.4 mm) Cube
  • N-BK7 Substrate

The shaded region in the graph to the right indicates the specified operating wavelength range.

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BS022 Support Documentation
BS022 Customer Inspired! 70:30 (R:T) Non-Polarizing Beamsplitter Cube, 400-700 nm, 1"
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90:10 (R:T) Cube Beamsplitter
90:10 Cube Beamsplitter Transmission
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Click Here for the Raw Data File
  • 90:10 (R:T) Split Ratio
  • 1" (25.4 mm) Cube
  • N-BK7 Substrate

The shaded region in the graph to the right indicates the specified operating wavelength range.

Based on your currency / country selection, your order will ship from Newton, New Jersey  
+1 Qty Docs Part Number - Universal/Imperial Price Available / Ships
BS028 Support Documentation
BS028 90:10 (R:T) Non-Polarizing Beamsplitter Cube, 400-700 nm, 1"
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