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Unmounted Photodiodes


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Unmounted Photodiodes

Mounted and Unmounted Detectors
Unmounted Photodiodes (150 - 2600 nm)
Calibrated Photodiodes (350 - 1800 nm)
Mounted Photodiodes (150 - 1800 nm)
Pigtailed Photodiodes (320 - 1000 nm)
Photoconductors (1 - 4.8 µm)

Features

  • GaP, Si, InGaAs, Ge, and Dual Band (Si/InGaAs) Detectors Available
  • Wavelength Ranges from 150 to 2600 nm

Thorlabs stocks a wide selection of discrete photodiodes (PD) in various active area size and packages. These include indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs), gallium phosphide (GaP), silicon (Si), and germanium (Ge) photodiodes. Inhomogeneity on the edge of an active area of the detector can generate unwanted capacitance and resistance that distorts the time-domain response of a photodiode. Thorlabs therefore recommends that the incident light on the photodiode is well centered on the active area. This can be accomplished by placing a focusing lens or pinhole in front of the detector element.

Thorlabs offers three photodiode packages with enhanced performance characteristics: DSD2, FGA20, and FGAP71. The DSD2 is a dual band photodiode, which incorporates two photodetectors sandwiched on top of each other (Si substrate on top of an InGaAs substrate), offering a combined wavelength range of 400 to 1700 nm. The FGA20 is an InGaAs PD with high responsivity from 1200 to 2600 nm, allowing detection of wavelengths beyond the normal 1800 nm range of typical InGaAs photodiodes. We also offer the FGAP71, a gallium phosphide (GaP) photodiode, which is useful for detection of UV light sources offering a wavelength range of 150 to 550 nm.

To complement our photodiode product line, we also offer a range of compatible mounts and accessories. Please note that the PDs sold below are not calibrated, and specifications may differ slightly from lot to lot. We also offer calibrated photodiodes, which come with with NIST-traceable calibration.

The responsivity of a particular photodiode varies from lot to lot. Due to this, the photodiode you receive may have a slightly different response than what is represented below. For example, to the right, a graph for the FDS1010 photodiode shows the extent that the response may vary. This data was collected from 104 photodiodes. Minimum, Average, and Maximum responsivity was calculated at each data point and has been plotted.

To view typical responsivity vs. wavelength data for each individual photodiode, please click the Info buttons in the product specifications tables below.

Photodiode Tutorial

Theory of Operation

A junction photodiode is an intrinsic device that behaves similarly to an ordinary signal diode, but it generates a photocurrent when light is absorbed in the depleted region of the junction semiconductor. A photodiode is a fast, highly linear device that exhibits high quantum efficiency based upon the application and may be used in a variety of different applications.

It is necessary to be able to correctly determine the level of the output current to expect and the responsivity based upon the incident light. Depicted in Figure 1 is a junction photodiode model with basic discrete components to help visualize the main characteristics and gain a better understanding of the operation of Thorlabs' photodiodes.

Equation 1
Photodiode Circuit Diagram
Figure 1: Photodiode Model

Photodiode Terminology

Responsivity
The responsivity of a photodiode can be defined as a ratio of generated photocurrent (IPD) to the incident light power (P) at a given wavelength:

Equation 2

Modes of Operation (Photoconductive vs. Photovoltaic)
A photodiode can be operated in one of two modes: photoconductive (reverse bias) or photovoltaic (zero-bias). Mode selection depends upon the application's speed requirements and the amount of tolerable dark current (leakage current).

Photoconductive
In photoconductive mode, an external reverse bias is applied, which is the basis for our DET series detectors. The current measured through the circuit indicates illumination of the device; the measured output current is linearly proportional to the input optical power. Applying a reverse bias increases the width of the depletion junction producing an increased responsivity with a decrease in junction capacitance and produces a very linear response. Operating under these conditions does tend to produce a larger dark current, but this can be limited based upon the photodiode material. (Note: Our DET detectors are reverse biased and cannot be operated under a forward bias.)

Photovoltaic
In photovoltaic mode the photodiode is zero biased. The flow of current out of the device is restricted and a voltage builds up. This mode of operation exploits the photovoltaic effect, which is the basis for solar cells. The amount of dark current is kept at a minimum when operating in photovoltaic mode.

Dark Current
Dark current is leakage current that flows when a bias voltage is applied to a photodiode. When operating in a photoconductive mode, there tends to be a higher dark current that varies directly with temperature. Dark current approximately doubles for every 10 °C increase in temperature, and shunt resistance tends to double for every 6 °C rise. Of course, applying a higher bias will decrease the junction capacitance but will increase the amount of dark current present.

The dark current present is also affected by the photodiode material and the size of the active area. Silicon devices generally produce low dark current compared to germanium devices which have high dark currents. The table below lists several photodiode materials and their relative dark currents, speeds, sensitivity, and costs.

MaterialDark CurrentSpeedSensitivityaCost
Silicon (Si)LowHigh Speed400 - 1000 nmLow
Germanium (Ge)HighLow Speed900 - 1600 nmLow
Gallium Phosphide (GaP)LowHigh Speed150 - 550 nmModerate
Indium Gallium Arsenide (InGaAs)LowHigh Speed800 - 1800 nmModerate
Indium Arsenide Antimonide (InAsSb)HighLow Speed1000 - 5800 nmHigh
Extended Range Indium Gallium Arsenide (InGaAs)HighHigh Speed1200 - 2600 nmHigh
Mercury Cadmium Telluride (MCT, HgCdTe)HighLow Speed2000 - 5400 nmHigh
  • Approximate

Junction Capacitance
Junction capacitance (Cj) is an important property of a photodiode as this can have a profound impact on the photodiode's bandwidth and response. It should be noted that larger diode areas encompass a greater junction volume with increased charge capacity. In a reverse bias application, the depletion width of the junction is increased, thus effectively reducing the junction capacitance and increasing the response speed.

Bandwidth and Response
A load resistor will react with the photodetector junction capacitance to limit the bandwidth. For best frequency response, a 50 Ω terminator should be used in conjunction with a 50 Ω coaxial cable. The bandwidth (fBW) and the rise time response (tr) can be approximated using the junction capacitance (Cj) and the load resistance (RLOAD):

Equation 3

Terminating Resistance
A load resistance is used to convert the generated photocurrent into a voltage (VOUT) for viewing on an oscilloscope:

Equation 4

Depending on the type of the photodiode, load resistance can affect the response speed. For maximum bandwidth, we recommend using a 50 Ω coaxial cable with a 50 Ω terminating resistor at the opposite end of the cable. This will minimize ringing by matching the cable with its characteristic impedance. If bandwidth is not important, you may increase the amount of voltage for a given light level by increasing RLOAD. In an unmatched termination, the length of the coaxial cable can have a profound impact on the response, so it is recommended to keep the cable as short as possible.

Shunt Resistance
Shunt resistance represents the resistance of the zero-biased photodiode junction. An ideal photodiode will have an infinite shunt resistance, but actual values may range from the order of ten Ω to thousands of MΩ and is dependent on the photodiode material. For example, and InGaAs detector has a shunt resistance on the order of 10 MΩ while a Ge detector is in the kΩ range. This can significantly impact the noise current on the photodiode. For most applications, however, the high resistance produces little effect and can be ignored.

Series Resistance
Series resistance is the resistance of the semiconductor material, and this low resistance can generally be ignored. The series resistance arises from the contacts and the wire bonds of the photodiode and is used to mainly determine the linearity of the photodiode under zero bias conditions.

Common Operating Circuits

Reverse Biased DET Circuit
Figure 2: Reverse-Biased Circuit (DET Series Detectors)

The DET series detectors are modeled with the circuit depicted above. The detector is reverse biased to produce a linear response to the applied input light. The amount ofphotocurrent generated is based upon the incident light and wavelength and can be viewed on an oscilloscope by attaching a load resistance on the output. The function of the RC filter is to filter any high frequency noise from the input supply that may contribute to a noisy output.

Reverse Biased DET Circuit
Figure 3: Amplified Detector Circuit

One can also use a photodetector with an amplifier for the purpose of achieving high gain. The user can choose whether to operate in Photovoltaic of Photoconductive modes. There are a few benefits of choosing this active circuit:

  • Photovoltaic mode: The circuit is held at zero volts across the photodiode, since point A is held at the same potential as point B by the operational amplifier. This eliminates the possibility of dark current.
  • Photoconductive mode: The photodiode is reversed biased, thus improving the bandwidth while lowering the junction capacitance. The gain of the detector is dependent on the feedback element (Rf). The bandwidth of the detector can be calculated using the following:

Equation 5

where GBP is the amplifier gain bandwidth product and CD is the sum of the junction capacitance and amplifier capacitance.

Effects of Chopping Frequency

The photoconductor signal will remain constant up to the time constant response limit. Many detectors, including PbS, PbSe, HgCdTe (MCT), and InAsSb, have a typical 1/f noise spectrum (i.e., the noise decreases as chopping frequency increases), which has a profound impact on the time constant at lower frequencies.

The detector will exhibit lower responsivity at lower chopping frequencies. Frequency response and detectivity are maximized for

Photoconductor Chopper Equation

The following table lists the photodiodes found on this page, along with the mounted photodiodes and packaged detectors which use the same internal photodiode.

 Photodetector Cross Reference
WavelengthMaterialUnmounted PhotodiodeUnmounted PhotoconductorMounted PhotodiodeBiased DetectorAmplified Detector
150 - 550 nmGaPFGAP71-SM05PD7ADET25KPDA25K
200 - 1100 nmSiFDS010-SM05PD2A
SM05PD2B
DET10APDA10A
200 - 1100 nmSi--SM1PD2A--
320 - 1100 nmSi----PDA8A
320 - 1100 nmSi----PDF10A
340 - 1100 nmSiFDS10X10----
350 - 1100 nmSiFDS100
FDS100-CAL a
-SM05PD1A
SM05PD1B
DET36APDA36A
400 - 1100 nmSiFDS025 b
FDS02 c
--
DET02AFC
DET025AFC
DET025A
DET025AL
-
400 - 1100 nmSiFDS1010
FDS1010-CAL a
-SM1PD1A
SM1PD1B
DET100APDA100A
400 - 1700 nmSi & InGaAsDSD2----
500 - 1700 nmInGaAs--DET10N--
700 - 1800 nmInGaAsFDGA05---PDA10CF
800 - 1700 nmInGaAs----PDF10C
800 - 1800 nmInGaAsFDGA05----
800 - 1800 nmInGaAsFGA10-SM05PD4ADET10CPDA10CS
800 - 1800 nmInGaAsFGA21
FGA21-CAL a
-SM05PD5ADET20CPDA20C
PDA20CS
800 - 1800 nmGeFDG03
FDG03-CAL a
-SM05PD6ADET30BPDA30B
800 - 1800 nmGeFDG50----
800 - 1800 nmGeFDG05
FDG05-CAL a
--DET50BPDA50B
800 - 1800 nmGeFDG1010-SM1PD5A--
850 - 1700 nmInGaAs---DET08CFC
DET08C
DET08CL
-
900 - 1700 nmInGaAsFGA01 b
FGA01FC c
--DET01CFC
SIR5-FC
-
1.0 - 2.9 µmPbS-FGPS3X3--PDA30G
1.2 - 2.6 µmInGaAsFGA20--DET10DPDA10D
1.5 - 4.8 µmPbSe-FGPSE2X2--PDA20H
  • Calibrated Unmounted Photodiode
  • Unmounted TO-46 Can Photodiode
  • Unmounted TO-46 Can Photodiode with FC/PC Bulkhead
  •  

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Posted Comments:
Poster: tanzwei
Posted Date: 2013-05-05 06:39:49.27
Could you like to tell me the damage threshold of FGA10 ?
Poster: jlow
Posted Date: 2013-05-09 11:19:00.0
Response from Jeremy at Thorlabs: I would recommend keeping the output current to be <10mA to avoid the internal wire in the FGA10 from failing. You can estimate the output current for your input power and wavelength from the responsivity graph on the 2nd page of the spec sheet at http://www.thorlabs.com/Thorcat/2200/FGA10-SpecSheet.pdf.
Poster: jlow
Posted Date: 2012-10-24 16:14:00.0
Response from Jeremy at Thorlabs: There's a ball lens covering the chip and it is not AR coated.
Poster: t.schmoll
Posted Date: 2012-10-18 13:30:14.92
Is there a window or a ball lens covering the chip? Is the window or ball lens AR coated? If so, for which wavelength is it optimized? Thank you! Tilman
Poster: jlow
Posted Date: 2012-09-05 09:15:00.0
Response from Jeremy at Thorlabs: I will get in contact with you directly to discuss about your application.
Poster: kkkdane
Posted Date: 2012-09-03 10:17:41.0
Hi, I’m a researcher in South of Korea Recently, I am developed infrared moisture detector. And I used LED and PD that is your product. I have a question. What is the question PD, LD(laser diode) and LED that use infrared moisture detector or infrared moisture analyzer? Recently, What other companies use the LED, PD that used the water detector of Commercial products? And what is commercial product? And, If you will give a detailed information about the LED, PD. I appreciate your help.
Poster: jlow
Posted Date: 2012-08-23 16:31:00.0
Response from Jeremy at Thorlabs: The junction capacitance between 4V and 5V is pretty much flat. Unfortunately we do not have any data on the capacitance and fall time specs beyond 5V.
Poster: Mathias.Helsen
Posted Date: 2012-08-22 06:14:07.0
I would like to use this diode as a detector for microwave modulated light, but the fall time at 5V is too high. How much doe the capacitance and fall time change when the bias voltage is increased?
Poster: jlow
Posted Date: 2012-08-17 11:16:00.0
Response from Jeremy at Thorlabs: We are not able to disclose the thicknesses for the PIN layers.
Poster: cardoza.david
Posted Date: 2012-08-17 09:50:00.0
Is there a way to get find out the thickness of the p, i and n regions of the FDS010 diodes? Thank you.
Poster: jlow
Posted Date: 2012-08-16 13:42:00.0
Response from Jeremy at Thorlabs: I will get in contact with you directly for the Excel spreadsheet. Please note that the spectral responsivity of your photodiode can be quite different than what is shown online. One alternative to using the FDS100 is the FDS100-CAL (http://www.thorlabs.com/NewGroupPage9.cfm?ObjectGroup_ID=2822&pn=FDS100-CAL) which is the NIST calibrated version of the FDS100.
Poster: brian.cox
Posted Date: 2012-08-16 12:13:51.0
Is the raw spectral responsivity data for the FDS100 available in an Excel spreadsheet? I'd like to get a more exact A/W value for my specific wavelengths of interest. Thanks!
Poster: tcohen
Posted Date: 2012-03-22 14:27:00.0
Response from Tim at Thorlabs: Thank you for your feedback. If the window is removed the diode can be easily damaged and absorb water from the atmosphere. This will be detrimental to the performance of the FGA10. If the window is removed we recommend storing it in an N2 dry box.
Poster: frank
Posted Date: 2012-03-22 13:31:41.0
Can you tell me if the performance of the FGA10 will degrade if its window is removed?
Poster: bdada
Posted Date: 2012-03-16 12:33:00.0
Response from Buki at Thorlabs: Thank you for your suggestion. We will work on adding dark current vs bias voltage charts to our website.
Poster:
Posted Date: 2012-03-15 19:02:40.0
Please consider adding a plot that shows the dark current as a function of bias voltage.
Poster: bdada
Posted Date: 2012-01-31 23:43:00.0
Response from Buki at Thorlabs: The temperature does have a slight effect on the responsivity, but mostly in near the bandgap region. We have sent you some typical curves to review.
Poster: ale.cere
Posted Date: 2012-01-30 12:27:49.0
I am currently working with a FDG05 and I notice that the efficiency changes with temperature, as indicated also in the datasheet. Is it available any data regarding the expected change in responsivity as funcion of temperature?
Poster: jjurado
Posted Date: 2011-07-07 09:57:00.0
Response from Javier at Thorlabs to jasiel.mora: Thank you very much for contacting us! We actually show a recommended circuit diagram for our photodiodes on their spec sheets. Take a look at the spec sheet for the FDG03 here: http://www.thorlabs.com/Thorcat/13800/13846-S01.pdf I will contact you directly in case you have any further questions.
Poster: jasiel.mora
Posted Date: 2011-07-06 16:42:48.0
Could you please sugest any connection diagram for the sensor FDG03? Thanks.
Poster:
Posted Date: 2011-04-20 13:08:43.0
What is the shunt resistance of FDS1010? Its not in the specs. A typ. and min. responsivity value would be useful as well.
Poster: jjurado
Posted Date: 2011-04-20 12:09:00.0
Response from Javier at Thorlabs to last poster: Thank you very much for contacting us. The shunt resistance of the FDS1010 photodiode is in the range of 50-200 MOhm (@ 10 mV reverse bias). Also, we have added a graph of the maximum, average, and minimum responsivity values for the FDS1010 (See Responsivity Graphs tab). Please contact us at techsupport@thorlabs.com if you have any further questions or comments.
Poster:
Posted Date: 2011-01-18 17:46:35.0
why a NIST-traceable calibration is not possible for FGA04? Im looking for a fiber-coupled detector that is provided with calibration.
Poster: julien
Posted Date: 2011-01-18 16:08:51.0
A response from Julien at Thorlabs: The FGA04 can only be calibrated at a predefined fixed wavelength by using a fiber coupled laser source. A calibration over the whole wavelength range of this photodiode is unfortunately not possible due to its small active area. Such a calibration would be made in free space using a monochromator, whose output beam diameter is about 1.5mm. Such a beam would largely overfill the active sensor area, and thus make the calibration highly inaccurate. You can contact our tech support (techsupport@thorlabs.com) to further discuss which solutions could be adapted to your need
Poster: Thorlabs
Posted Date: 2010-10-28 15:01:31.0
Response from Javier at Thorlabs to kleap: at 5 W/cm^2, the detector will most likely be saturated; however, we specify a damage threshold of 10 W/cm^2 for the FDG05, so I do not expect excessive power to be the reason for failure. Also, we do not have a lifetime spec, since there are too many factors involved. I will contact you directly to troubleshoot your application.
Poster: kleap
Posted Date: 2010-10-28 13:45:47.0
Our FDG05 are failing roughly 3 months of use. What is the expected life of these detectors? We are exposing indirect UV light around 5W/cm2 of intensity to the LADs. Could this be of a concern?
Poster: Thorlabs
Posted Date: 2010-07-23 14:06:31.0
Response from Javier at Thorlabs to ranutyagi: Thank you for your feedback. With an input of 10 mW, you will most likely end up damaging your photodiodes. As a guideline, we specify a maximum input power density of 100 mW/cm^2. So, for example, if we assume that you have a 10 mW, 2 mm diameter beam at the input, the resulting power density is ~333mW/cm^2, which clearly exceeds the damage threshold. For linear operation of the photodiode, we recommend limiting the input to ~ 1 mW. Above this value, the diode undergoes saturation and, eventually, damage.
Poster: ranutyagi
Posted Date: 2010-07-23 07:03:58.0
I am using FDS100 and FDS010 with CW 10mW peak power laser diode. will it be damaging my photodiode? How much is the maximum input power these diodes can sustain.
Poster: Adam
Posted Date: 2010-04-29 16:58:35.0
A response from Adam at Thorlabs to marcoc: Saturation occurs for these diodes at approximately 10mW. We would suggest using these diodes with peak and average powers that are less than 10mW if you want to avoid saturation.
Poster: marcoc
Posted Date: 2010-04-29 16:51:34.0
Any idea about the saturation for pulsed (50fs) laser beam at 800 nm ? thanks marco
Poster: apalmentieri
Posted Date: 2010-01-14 15:34:33.0
A response from Adam at Thorlabs to Curtis: The operating and storage temperature ranges for the FDS100 are the following: -25 to +85 deg C operating, -40 to +100 deg C storage.
Poster: curtis.m.ihlefeld
Posted Date: 2010-01-14 15:12:09.0
Dear Sirs, I have several FDS100 photodiodes and would like to know the allowable temperature ranges for operation and storage. Regards, Curtis Ihlefeld
Poster: danhickstein
Posted Date: 2009-08-07 14:16:56.0
Dear Thorlabs, It would be nice to have the wavelength response for the FDS02 plotted on the Graphs page. I found the graph on the spec sheet, but it would be nice to see it plotted on the same graph as the rest of the FDS series. Regards, Dan
Poster: Tyler
Posted Date: 2009-02-02 09:25:34.0
A response from Tyler at Thorlabs to ocarlsson: The FGA04 spec sheet available under the Drawings and Documents tab lists the max forward current as 10 mA and the damage threshold at 70 mW. The damage threshold is the point at which the photodiode sensor will fail, however, internal wires in the FGA04 package will fail when the forward current exceeds 10 mA. Use the responsivity curve in the spec sheet to approximate the forward current for a given wavelength or contact our technical support department for assistance. An optical fiber attenuator like the FA05T, FA10T, FA15T, or FA25T can be used in to reduce the power in the optical fiber to a level that is safe to use with the FGA04. Thank you for your question, I will be adding a note to the bottom of the table on the Specs tab to help future customers with this issue.
Poster: ocarlsson
Posted Date: 2009-01-16 02:31:20.0
The FGA04 max current is 10mA and damage threshold is 100mW. Responsivity 0.8. How is the damage threshold calculated? Best regards Olle
GaP Photodiode - UV Wavelengths
  • Extremely Short Wavelength Range (150 - 550 nm)
  • Fast Rise Time
  • Mounted in a Hermetically Sealed Package with a Sapphire Window
Item #InfoWavelength
Range
Active
Area
PackageRise/Fall
Timea
NEP
(W/Hz1/2)
Dark
Current
Junction
Capacitance
Compatible
Sockets
FGAP71 info 150 - 550 nm 4.8 mm2
(2.2 mm x 2.2 mm)
TO-39 1 ns / 140 ns
@ 5 V
1.0 x 10-14
@ 1550 nm, 5 V
40 pA (Typ.)
@ 5 V
1000 pF @ 0 V STO5S
STO5P
  • Typical values. RL = 50 Ω
Based on your currency / country selection, your order will ship from Newton, New Jersey  
+1 Qty Docs Part Number - Universal/Imperial Price Available / Ships
FGAP71 Support Documentation
FGAP71 GaP Photodiode, 1 ns Rise Time, 150-550 nm, 2.2 mm × 2.2 mm Active Area
$85.90
Today
Si Photodiodes - VIS Wavelengths
Click Image
for Details
FDS010 FDS10X10 FDS100 FDS025 FDS02 FDS1010
Item # FDS010 FDS10X10 FDS100 FDS025 FDS02 FDS1010
Key Feature UV Grade Fused Silica Window to Provide Sensitivity Down to 200 nm Largest Active Area and Housed in a Ceramic Package Largest Sensor in a TO-5 Can High Speed and Low Capacitance in a TO-46 Can with a Ball Lens High Speed and Low Capacitance in a Direct Fiber-Coupled FC/PC Package Large Active Area and is Mounted on an Insulating Ceramic Substrate
Info info info info info info info
Wavelength Range 200 - 1100 nm 340 - 1100 nm 350 - 1100 nm 400 - 1100 nm 400 - 1100 nm 400 - 1100 nm
Active Area 0.82 mm2 (Ø1.02 mm) 100 mm2 (10 mm x 10 mm) 13 mm2 (3.6 mm x 3.6 mm) 0.049 mm2 (Ø0.25 mm) 0.049 mm2 (Ø0.25 mm) 100 mm2 (10 mm x 10 mm)
Package TO-5 Ceramic TO-5 TO-46 TO-46, FC/PC Bulkhead Ceramic
Rise/Fall Timea 1 ns / 1 ns @ 10 V 150 ns / 150 ns @ 5 V 10 ns / 10 ns @ 20 V 47 ps / 246 ps @ 5 V 47 ps / 246 ps @ 5 V 45 ns / 45 ns @ 5 V
NEP (W/Hz1/2) 1.2 x 10-13 @ 830 nm, 10 V 1.50 x 10-14 @ 1550 nm 1.2 x 10-14 @ 900 nm, 20 V 9.29 x 10-15 @ 850 nm, 20 V 9.29 x 10-15 @ 850 nm, 20 V 2.07 x 10-13 @ 970 nm, 5 V
Dark Current 0.3 nA (Typ.) @ 10 V 200 pA @ 5 V 1.0 nA (Typ.); 20 nA (Max.) @ 20 V 35 pA (Typ.) @ 5 V 35 pA (Typ.) @ 5 V 1.05 nA (Typ.) @ 5 V
Junction
Capacitancea
6 pF (Typ.) @ 10 V 380 pF @ 5 V 24 pF (Typ.) @ 20 V 0.94 pF (Typ.) @ 5 V 0.94 pF (Typ.) @ 5 V 432 pF (Typ.) @ 5 V
Compatible
Sockets
STO5S
STO5P
Not Available STO5S
STO5P
STO46S
STO46P
STO46S
STO46P
Not Available
  • Typical values. RL = 50 Ω
Based on your currency / country selection, your order will ship from Newton, New Jersey  
+1 Qty Docs Part Number - Universal/Imperial Price Available / Ships
FDS010 Support Documentation
FDS010 Si Photodiode, 1 ns Rise Time, 200 - 1100 nm, Ø1 mm Active Area
$42.10
Today
FDS10X10 Support Documentation
FDS10X10 Si Photodiode, 150 ns Rise Time, 340 - 1100 nm, 10 mm x 10 mm Active Area
$100.00
Today
FDS100 Support Documentation
FDS100 Si Photodiode, 10 ns Rise Time, 350 - 1100 nm, 3.6 mm x 3.6 mm Active Area
$13.10
Today
FDS025 Support Documentation
FDS025 Si Photodiode, 47 ps Rise Time, 400 - 1100 nm, Ø0.25 mm Active Area
$30.00
Today
FDS02 Support Documentation
FDS02 Si Photodiode, 47 ps Rise Time, 400 - 1100 nm, Ø0.25 mm Active Area, FC/PC Bulkhead
$73.50
Today
FDS1010 Support Documentation
FDS1010 Si Photodiode, 40 ns Rise Time, 400 - 1100 nm, 10 mm x 10 mm Active Area
$48.80
Today
InGaAs Photodiodes - NIR Wavelengths
Click Image
for Details
FDGA05 FGA10 FGA21 FGA01 FGA01FC FGA20
Item # FDGA05 FGA10 FGA21 FGA01 FGA01FC FGA20
Key Feature High Speed, High Responsivity, and Low Capacitance High Speed and Large Active Area Largest Active Area of the Series High Speed and Low Capacitance in a TO-46 Can with a Ball Lens High Speed and Low Capacitance in a Direct Fiber-Coupled FC/PC Package Long Wavelength Range
Info info info info info info info
Wavelength Range 800 - 1800 nm 800 - 1800 nm 800 - 1800 nm 800 - 1700 nm 800 - 1700 nm 1200 - 2600 nm
Active Area 0.196 mm2 (Ø0.5 mm) 0.79 mm2 (Ø1 mm) 3.1 mm2 (Ø2 mm) 0.01 mm2 (Ø0.12 mm) 0.01 mm2 (Ø0.12 mm) 0.79 mm2 (Ø1 mm)
Package TO-46 TO-5 TO-5 TO-46 TO-46, FC/PC Bulkhead TO-18
Rise/Fall Timea 2.5 ns / 2.5 ns @ 5 V 7 ns / 7 ns @ 5 V 66 ns / 66 ns @ 0 V 300 ps / 300 ps @ 5 V 300 ps / 300 ps @ 5 V 23 ns / 23 ns @ 1 V
NEP (W/Hz1/2) 0.8 x 10-14 @ 1550 nm 2.5 x 10-14 @ 900 nm, 2 V 3.0 x 10-14 @ 1500 nm 4.5 x 10-15 @ 1500 nm 4.5 x 10-15 @ 1500 nm 2.0 x 10-12 @ 2300 nm
Dark Current 6 nA (Typ.) @ 5 V 1.1 nA (Typ.) @ 5 V 50 nA (Typ.) @ 1 V 0.05 nA (Typ.) @ 5 V 0.05 nA (Typ.) @ 5 V 15 µA (Typ.) @ 1 V
Junction
Capacitancea
10 pF @ 5 V 65 pF (Typ.) @ 5 V 100 pF (Typ.) @ 3 V 2.0 pF @ 5 V 2.0 pF @ 5 V 200 pF (Typ.) @ 1 V
Compatible
Sockets
STO46S
STO46P
STO5S
STO5P
STO5S
STO5P
STO46S
STO46P
STO46S
STO46P
STO46S
STO46P
  • Typical values. RL = 50 Ω
Based on your currency / country selection, your order will ship from Newton, New Jersey  
+1 Qty Docs Part Number - Universal/Imperial Price Available / Ships
FDGA05 Support Documentation
FDGA05 InGaAs Photodiode, 2.5 ns Rise Time, 800-1800 nm, Ø0.5 mm Active Area
$130.00
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FGA10 Support Documentation
FGA10 InGaAs Photodiode, 7 ns Rise Time, 800-1800 nm, Ø1 mm Active Area
$158.10
Today
FGA21 Support Documentation
FGA21 InGaAs Photodiode, 66 ns Rise Time, 800 - 1800 nm, Ø2 mm Active Area
$212.00
Today
FGA01 Support Documentation
FGA01 InGaAs Photodiode, 300 ps Rise Time, 800-1700 nm, Ø0.12 mm Active Area
$55.00
Today
FGA01FC Support Documentation
FGA01FC InGaAs Photodiode, 300 ps Rise Time, 800-1700 nm, Ø0.12 mm Active Area, FC/PC Bulkhead
$140.00
Today
FGA20 Support Documentation
FGA20 InGaAs Photodiode, 23 ns Rise Time, 1200-2600 nm, Ø1 mm Active Area
$254.00
Today
Ge Photodiodes - NIR Wavelengths
Click Image
for Details
FDG03 FDG50 FDG05 FDG1010
Item # FDG03 FDG50 FDG05a FDG1010a
Key Feature Large Active Area in a TO-5 Can Large Active Area in a TO-8 Can High Speed on a Ceramic Substrate Largest Area on a Ceramic Substrate
Info info info info info
Wavelength Range 800 - 1800 nm 800 - 1800 nm 800 - 1800 nm 800 - 1800 nm
Active Area 7.1 mm2 (Ø3 mm) 19.6 mm2 (Ø5 mm) 19.6 mm2 (Ø5 mm) 100 mm2 (10 mm x 10 mm)
Package TO-5 TO-8 Ceramic Ceramic
Rise/Fall Timeb 500 ns / 500 ns @ 3 V 220 ns / 220 ns (Typ.) @ 10 V 220 ns / 220 ns @ 5 V 3.5 µs / 3.5 µs @ 1 V
NEP (W/Hz1/2) 1.0 x 10-12 @ 1550 nm 4.0 x 10-12 @ 1550 nm 4.0 x 10-12 @ 1550 nm 4.0 x 10-12 @ 1550 nm
Dark Current 1.0 µA (Typ.) @ 1 V 60 µA (Max) @ 5 V 10 µA (Typ.) @ 5 V 50 µA (Typ.) @ 0.3 V
Junction
Capacitanceb
3250 pF (Typ.) @ 1 V 1800 pF (Max) @ 5 V; 16000 pF (Max) @ 0 V 3000 pF (Typ.) @ 5 V 30 nF (Typ.) @ 1 V
Compatible
Sockets
STO5S
STO5P
STO8S
STO8P
Not Available Not Available
  • Please note that the wire leads on the FDG05 and FDG1010 are attached to the sensor using a conductive epoxy, as soldering them on would damage the sensor. This results in a fragile bond. Care should be taken while handing this unit so that the wire leads are not broken.
  • Typical values. RL = 50 Ω
Based on your currency / country selection, your order will ship from Newton, New Jersey  
+1 Qty Docs Part Number - Universal/Imperial Price Available / Ships
FDG03 Support Documentation
FDG03 Ge Photodiode, 500 ns Rise Time, 800 - 1800 nm, Ø3 mm Active Area
$121.50
Today
FDG50 Support Documentation
FDG50 Ge Photodiode, 220 ns Rise Time, 800 - 1800 nm, Ø5 mm Active Area
$257.50
Today
FDG05 Support Documentation
FDG05 Ge Photodiode, 220 ns Rise Time, 800 - 1800 nm, Ø5 mm Active Area
$232.40
Today
FDG1010 Support Documentation
FDG1010 Ge Photodiode, 3.5 µs Rise Time, 800 - 1800 nm, 10 mm x 10 mm Active Area
$426.00
Today
Dual Band Si/InGaAs Photodiode
  • Dual Detector Chip Design - Si Over InGaAs - Provides Wide Detector Range
  • 4-Pin TO-5 Package
  • Large Active Area
Item #InfoWavelength
Range
Active
Area
PackageRise/Fall
Timea
NEP
(W/Hz1/2)
Dark
Current
Junction
Capacitancea
Compatible
Sockets
DSD2 info 400 - 1100 nm
(Si)
940 - 1700 nm
(InGaAs)
5.07 mm2
(Ø2.54 mm, Si)
1.77 mm2
(Ø1.50 mm, InGaAs)
TO-5 4.0 µs
(Both Layers)
@ 3V
1.9 x 10-14
(Si)
2.1 x 10-13
(InGaAs)
1 nA @ 1 V
(Si)
0.5 nA @ 1 V
(InGaAs)
26 pF @ 1 V
(Si)
143 pF @ 1 V
(InGaAs)
STO5S
STO5P
  • Typical Values. RL = 50 Ω
Based on your currency / country selection, your order will ship from Newton, New Jersey  
+1 Qty Docs Part Number - Universal/Imperial Price Available / Ships
DSD2 Support Documentation
DSD2 Dual Band Si/InGaAs Detector, 4 µs Rise Time, 400 - 1700 nm, Ø2.54/Ø1.5 mm
$532.00
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