Thorlabs Inc.
Visit the 225 W TEC Controller page for pricing and availability information

225 W TEC Controller

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OVERVIEW

Item #TED4015
Temperature Stability0.002 °C (24 hrs)
TEC Output±15 A
Compliance Voltage>15 V
Temperature Control Range-55 to 150 °C
Resistance Measurement Range
(2 Ranges)
100 Ω to 100 kΩ or
1kΩ to 1MΩ
Temperature Resolution0.001 °C
(0.1 Ω/1 Ω for Thermistors)

Applications

  • Precise Temperature Stabilization of Laser Diodes for Interferometry and Spectroscopy
  • Control Temperature Set Point via External Input (Active Laser Wavelength Stabilization)
  • Cooling of Detectors for Noise Reduction
  • Temperature Stabilization of Nonlinear Crystals
  • Temperature Stabilization of Industrial Systems

Features

  • Excellent Temperature Stability: 0.002 °C (24 hrs)
  • Digital PID Control with Separate P, I, and D Settings
  • Automatic PID Setting Function
  • Temperature Display in °C, °F, K
  • Adjustable Temperature Sensor Offset
  • Active Power Management for Efficient Power Use
  • Compatible Sensors:
    • NTC Thermistors
    • Current Temperature Sensors
    • Voltage Temperature Sensors
    • Platinum RTD Temperature Sensors
  • Control Modes:
    • Constant Temperature
    • Constant Current
  • Enhanced Security Features:
    • Adjustable TEC Current Limit
    • Adjustable Temperature Limits
    • Temperature Window Protection
    • Sensor Fault Protection
  • Interface and Drivers:
    • USB Interface (SCPI Compliant)
    • VXIpnp/VISA Drivers for Common Programming Environments like LabWindows/CVI™, LabVIEW™, and MS Visual Studio™

The TED4015 is a high-performance digital temperature controller designed to drive thermoelectric cooler (TEC) elements with currents up to ±15 A. It supports most common temperature sensors and can be adapted to different thermal loads. The TED4015 can be fully controlled via its robust, SCPI-compatible USB interface. The digital PID control offers an auto PID setting function or separate control of the P, I, and D parameters. The TED4015 boasts excellent temperature stability of 0.002 °C within 24 hrs, enhanced safeguard features, and error indicators, making this device ideal for cooling very sensitive devices where high stability, reliability, and precision is required.

Compared to our TED200C Temperature Controller, the TED4015 offers a wider TEC current range plus additional features like full digital control, easy auto PID setting, constant TEC current mode, set temperature protection, TEC voltage measurement, and adjustable temperature window protection. The TED4015 also offers silent operation.

Adaptability to Different Thermal Loads

The TED4015 can easily be adapted to different thermal loads by a digital PID loop. The P (proportional) gain, the I (integral) offset control, and the D (derivative or differential) rates can be individually adjusted by the user or by the auto PID function. With optimum PID parameters, the settling time for a temperature change of 1 °C for a laser mounted in our LM14S2 Laser Diode Mount is less than 2 seconds.

Supported Temperature Sensors

The TED4015 temperature controller supports almost all common temperature sensors. A sensor selection in the Temperature Control Menu allows the use of thermistors up to 1000 kΩ, the use of a temperature sensing IC (such as the AD590) or the use of platinum RTD sensors. The temperature can be displayed in Celsius, Fahrenheit or Kelvin. For thermistors, two temperature calculation methods can be selected: Steinhart-Hart or exponential. The maximum control range is -55 to 150 °C, limited by the rated temperature range of the connected sensor and thermal setup.

Enhanced Security Features

The TED4015 is designed for maximum TEC element protection and stable as well as reliable operation. An adjustable TEC output current limit prevents the controller from overdriving the TEC element. This limit can be set from 0.1 A to the current range of the controller. Adjustable temperature limits and the temperature window protection provide alerts if the temperature of the TEC element exceed certain values.

The system indicates the presence of an incorrect or missing temperature sensor and a bad connection between sensor and controller by an LED on the TEC "On" key and an audible warning signal. The TEC current is automatically switched off if an error occurs.

Temperature Monitor Output

The TED4015 provides a monitoring signal proportional to the difference between actual and set temperature. An oscilloscope or an analog data acquisition card can be connected directly to the rear panel BNC connector to monitor the settling behavior with different thermal loads.

Companion Products

Our LDC200C Laser Diode Controllers are ideal companions for the TED4015. When combined with our TEC laser mounts, the TED4015 can achieve a thermal stability of 0.001 °C. This temperature stability is required for applications like laser diode wavelength tuning and atomic absorption cell spectroscopy.


The TED4015 Ships with the Following Parts:

  • Laser Mount Cable for TED4015: 5 A, 17W2, D-Sub-9 (Item Number CAB4000, Also Sold Below)
  • DB-9 Connectors: 17W2, Male and Female, with Two High-Current 20 A Contacts (Item Number CON4001, Also Sold Below)
  • USB Cable A-B, 2 m
  • Driver CD
  • Certificate of Calibration
  • Operating Manual
Hide Specs

SPECS

Item #TED4015
 Front PanelaRemote Controla
TEC Current Output
Control Range-15 A to +15 A
Compliance Voltage>15 V
Maximum Output Power>225 W
Resolution (Constant Current Mode)1 mA0.1 mA
Accuracy±(0.2% + 20 mA)
Noise and Ripple (Typical)<10 mA rms
TEC Current Limit
Setting Range0.1 A to 15 A
Resolution1 mA0.1 mA
Accuracy±(0.2% + 10 mA)
NTC Thermistor Sensors
Resistance Measurement Ranges100 Ω to 100 kΩ / 1 kΩ to 1 MΩ
Control Range (Max)b-55 to 150 °C
Resolution (Temperature)0.001 °C
Resolution (Resistance, 100 kΩ/1 MΩ Range)0.1 Ω / 1 Ω0.03 Ω / 0.3 Ω
Accuracy (100 kΩ/1 MΩ Range)±(0.06% + 1 Ω / 5 Ω)
Temperature Stability 24 hours (Typical)b<0.002 °C
Temperture Coefficient<5 mK/°C
IC Sensors
Supported Current Temperature SensorsAD590, AD592
Supported Voltage Temperature SensorsLM335, LM235, LM135, LM35
    Control Range with AD590-55 to 150 °C
    Control Range with AD592-25 to 105 °C
    Control Range with LM335-40 to 100 °C
    Control Range with LM235-40 to 125 °C
    Control Range with LM135-55 to 150 °C
    Control Range with LM35-55 to 150 °C
Resolution0.001 °C0.0001 °C
Accuracy AD590 Current± (0.04% + 0.08 µA)
Accuracy LM335/LM35 Voltage± (0.03% + 1.5 mV)
Temperature Stability 24 hours<0.002 °C
Temperature Coefficient<5 mK/°C
PT100/PT1000 RTD Sensors
Temperature Control Range-55 to 150 °C
Resolution0.001 °C0.0003 °C
Accuracy PT100/PT1000 (4-Wire Measurement)±0.3 °C/±0.1 °C
Temperature Stability 24 hours<0.005 °C
Temperture Coefficient<20 mK/°C
Temperature Window Protection
Setting Range Twin0.01 to 100.0 °C
Protection Reset Delay0 to 600 sec
Window Protection OutputBNC, TTL
Temperature Control Output
Load Resistance>10 kΩ
Transmission CoefficientΔT x 5 V / Twin ± 0.2 % (Temperature Deviation, Scaled to Temperature Window)
TEC Voltage Measurement
Measurement Principle4-Wire / 2-Wire
Resolution100 mV40 mV
Accuracy (with 4-wire Measurement)±50 mV
Digital I/O Port
Number of I/O Lines4 (Separately Configurable)
Input LevelTTL, Voltage Tolerant up to 24 V
Output Level (Source Operation)TTL, Max 2 mA
Output Level (Sink Operation)Open Collector, up to 24 V, Max 400 mA
Interface
USB 2.0According USBTMC/USBTMC-USB488 Specification Rev. 1.0
ProtocolSCPI-Compliant Command Set
DriversVISA VXIpnp™, MS Visual Studio™, MS Visual Studio.net™, NI LabView™, NI Labwindos/CVI™
General Data
Safety FeaturesTEC Current Limit, Sensor Fault Protection, Short Circuit when TEC Off, Open Circuit Protection, Temperature Setpoint Limit, Window Protection, Over Temperature Protection
DisplayLCD 320 x 240 pixels
Connector for Sensor, TE Cooler, TEC On Signal17W2 Mixed D-sub Jack (female)
Connectors for Deviation Out / Window Protection OutBNC
Connector for Digital I/OMini DIN 6
Connector for USB InterfaceUSB Type B
Chassis Ground Connector4 mm Banana Jack
Line Voltage / Frequency100 to120 V and 200 to 240 V ± 10%, 50 to 60 Hz
Maximum Power Consumption600 VA
Mains Supply OvervoltageCategory II (Cat II)
Operating Temperature0 to 40 °C
Storage Temperature-40 to 70 °C
Relative HumidityMax. 80% Up to 31 °C, Decreasing to 50% at 40 °C
Pollution Degree (Indoor Use Only)2
Operation Altitude<2000 m
Warm-Up Time for Rated Accuracy30 min
Weight5.3 kg
Dimensions (W x H x D) w/o Operating Elements263 mm x 122 mm x 307 mm
Dimensions (W x H x D) with Operating Elements263 mm x 122 mm x 345 mm
  • Via front panel the resolution is limited by the display. Via Remote Control a higher resolution is offered.
  • Control range and thermal stability depend on thermistor parameters.

All technical data valid at 23 ± 5 °C and 45 ± 15% relative humidity

Hide Front & Back Panel

FRONT & BACK PANEL

TED4015 Front Panel

CalloutConnectionCalloutConnection
1Supply Power Switch4Escape Key
2LC Display5TEC Status Indicator
3Softkeys for Menu Navigation6Adjustment Knob

TED4015 Back Panel

CalloutConnectionCalloutConnection
1Actual Temperature Deviation Output "Deviation Out" -5 to 5 V6USB Connector
2TTL Temperature Monitor Output
"Temp OK Out" 5 V
74 mm Banana Jack for Chassis Ground
3Serial Number of the Unit8MiniDin-6 Jack "Digital I/O"
4Cooling Fan
5TEC Element Output and Temperature Sensor Input "TEC Output"9Power Connector and Fuse Holder "Line In"
Hide Pin Diagrams

PIN DIAGRAMS

TEC Output

17W2 Mixed D-Sub Jack

Pin Configuration

PinConnectionPinConnection
1Interlock, TEC ON LED (+)10PT100/1000 (-), AD590/592 (-), LM35 Out, LM135/235/335 (+)
2Voltage Measurement TEC Element (+)11PT100/1000 (+), AD590/592 (+), LM35/135/235/335 (+)
3Thermistor (-), PT100/1000 (-), Analog Ground12Analog Ground, LM35/135/235/335 (-)
4Thermistor (+), PT100/1000 (+)13Not Connected
5Analog Ground, LM35/135/235/335 (-)14I/O 1-wire (Currently Not Used)
6Digital Ground for I/O 1-wire15Ground for 12 V Output and Interlock, TEC ON LED (-)
712 V Output (for External Fan, max. current = 500 mA)S1TEC Element (+) (Peltier Element)
8Not ConnectedS2TEC Element (-)(Peltier Element)
9Voltage Measurement TEC Element (-)

Digital I/O Ports

Digital I/O

PinConnection
1I/O 1
2I/O 2
3I/O 3
4I/O 4
5GND
6I/O Supply Voltage (+12 V from internal or higher external voltage up to +24 V)

Deviation Out

BNC Female

BNC Female

Actual temperature deviation output, -5 ... +5 V

Temp OK Out

BNC Female

BNC Female

Temperature OK output (high if inside temperature window), TTL 5 V

Computer Connection

USB Type B

USB Type B

USB Type B to Type A Cable Included

Ground

 

Banana Plug

 


4 mm banana jack for chassis ground

 

CAB4000 TEC Element Cable

This cable contains a DB-9 female connector on one side and a 17W2 male connector on the other side. Both views shown below are looking into the connector.

Female DB-9 Pin Diagram
DB-9 Female Connector
Male 17W2 Pin Diagram
17W2 Male Connector
Pin Matching
DB-9 Pin17W2 Pin(s)
11, 15
24
33
42, S1
59, S2
6No Connection
710
85, 12
911
ShieldShield
DB-9 Connector Colors
PinColor
1White
2Pink and Gray
3Red and Blue
4Pink, Red, and Purple
5Black, Gray, and Blue
6No Connection
7Yellow
8Brown
9Green
17W2 Connector Colors
PinColorPinColor
1White10Yellow
2Red11Green
3Red and Blue12Brown
4Pink and Gray13No Connection
5Brown14No Connection
6No Connection15White
7No ConnectionS1Purple and Pink
8No ConnectionS2Black and Gray
9Blue
Hide Display Screens

DISPLAY SCREENS

Sample Screens of the TED4000

Measurement ScreenMenu Screen
 Measurement ScreenThe top of this screen shows the Temperature Setpoint: temperature in Constant Temperature Mode and current in Constant Current Mode. At the bottom the actual measured value is shown. The units depend on the attached sensor. Peltier Current, Peltier Voltage and Peltier Power can be shown as well. A status line shows warnings and error-messages. Menu ScreenThe menu screen allows selecting different operation modes and options.
Temperature Controller ScreenTemperature Mode Settings Screen
 Temperature Controller ScreenVia the Temperature Controller Screen all parameters for the temperature controller are entered: Operation Mode, Current Limit, Current Control Mode Settings, Temperature Sensor Settings. Temperature Mode Settings ScreenThis Screen offers access to the PID and Temperature Limit Settings.
PID Auto-Tune ScreenPreference Screen
 PID Auto-Tune ScreenVia this Screen the PID auto parameter function is started. The TED4000 selects optimal PID parameters for the current settings. Preference ScreenThis Screen offers access to the device preferences, i.e. operation and display modes.
Hide Software

SOFTWARE

Software for Laser Diode Controllers

The download button below links to VISA VXI pnp™, MS Visual Studio™, MS Visual Studio.net™, LabVIEW™, and LabWindows/CVI™ drivers, firmware, utilities, and support documentation for Thorlabs' ITC4000 Series laser controllers, LDC4000 Series laser controllers, and the CLD1015, CLD1010LP, and CLD1011LP compact laser diode controllers.

Software

Version 3.1.0 (April 11, 2014)

Software Download

The software packages support LabVIEW 8.5 and higher. If you are using an earlier version of LabVIEW, please contact Technical Support for assistance.

Hide Shipping List

SHIPPING LIST

The TED4015 ships with the following Parts:

TED4015Part
xBenchtop Temperature Controller, ±15 A/225 W (TED4015)
xCable TED4000 to laser mount, 5 A, 17W2, D-Sub-9 (CAB4000)
xUSB Cable A-B, 2 m
xOperation Manual TED4015
xDistribution CD 4000 Series
xMixed D-Sub connector 17W2, male & female with 2 high current contacts each, 20 A (CON4001)
Hide PID Tutorial

PID TUTORIAL

PID Basics

The PID circuit is often utilized as a control loop feedback controller and is very commonly used for many forms of servo circuits. The letters making up the acronym PID correspond to Proportional (P), Integral (I), and Derivative (D), which represents the three control settings of a PID circuit. The purpose of any servo circuit is to hold the system at a predetermined value (set point) for long periods of time. The PID circuit actively controls the system so as to hold it at the set point by generating an error signal that is essentially the difference between the set point and the current value. The three controls relate to the time-dependent error signal; at its simplest, this can be thought of as follows: Proportional is dependent upon the present error, Integral is dependent upon the accumulation of past error, and Derivative is the prediction of future error. The results of each of the controls are then fed into a weighted sum, which then adjusts the output of the circuit, u(t). This output is fed into a control device, its value is fed back into the circuit, and the process is allowed to actively stabilize the circuit’s output to reach and hold at the set point value. The block diagram below illustrates very simply the action of a PID circuit. One or more of the controls can be utilized in any servo circuit depending on system demand and requirement (i.e., P, I, PI, PD, or PID).

PID Diagram

Through proper setting of the controls in a PID circuit, relatively quick response with minimal overshoot (passing the set point value) and ringing (oscillation about the set point value) can be achieved. Let’s take as an example a temperature servo, such as that for temperature stabilization of a laser diode. The PID circuit will ultimately servo the current to a Thermo Electric Cooler (TEC) (often times through control of the gate voltage on an FET). Under this example, the current is referred to as the Manipulated Variable (MV). A thermistor is used to monitor the temperature of the laser diode, and the voltage over the thermistor is used as the Process Variable (PV). The Set Point (SP) voltage is set to correspond to the desired temperature. The error signal, e(t), is then just the difference between the SP and PV. A PID controller will generate the error signal and then change the MV to reach the desired result. If, for instance, e(t) states that the laser diode is too hot, the circuit will allow more current to flow through the TEC (proportional control). Since proportional control is proportional to e(t), it may not cool the laser diode quickly enough. In that event, the circuit will further increase the amount of current through the TEC (integral control) by looking at the previous errors and adjusting the output in order to reach the desired value. As the SP is reached [e(t) approaches zero], the circuit will decrease the current through the TEC in anticipation of reaching the SP (derivative control).

Please note that a PID circuit will not guarantee optimal control. Improper setting of the PID controls can cause the circuit to oscillate significantly and lead to instability in control. It is up to the user to properly adjust the PID gains to ensure proper performance.

PID Theory

The output of the PID control circuit, u(t), is given as

Equation 1

where
Kp= Proportional Gain
Ki = Integral Gain
Kd = Derivative Gain
e(t) = SP - PV(t)

From here we can define the control units through their mathematical definition and discuss each in a little more detail. Proportional control is proportional to the error signal; as such, it is a direct response to the error signal generated by the circuit:

Equation 2

Larger proportional gain results is larger changes in response to the error, and thus affects the speed at which the controller can respond to changes in the system. While a high proportional gain can cause a circuit to respond swiftly, too high a value can cause oscillations about the SP value. Too low a value and the circuit cannot efficiently respond to changes in the system.

Integral control goes a step further than proportional gain, as it is proportional to not just the magnitude of the error signal but also the duration of the error.

Equation 3

Integral control is highly effective at increasing the response time of a circuit along with eliminating the steady-state error associated with purely proportional control. In essence integral control sums over the previous error, which was not corrected, and then multiplies that error by Ki to produce the integral response. Thus, for even small sustained error, a large aggregated integral response can be realized. However, due to the fast response of integral control, high gain values can cause significant overshoot of the SP value and lead to oscillation and instability. Too low and the circuit will be significantly slower in responding to changes in the system.

Derivative control attempts to reduce the overshoot and ringing potential from proportional and integral control. It determines how quickly the circuit is changing over time (by looking at the derivative of the error signal) and multiplies it by Kd to produce the derivative response.

Equation 4

Unlike proportional and integral control, derivative control will slow the response of the circuit. In doing so, it is able to partially compensate for the overshoot as well as damp out any oscillations caused by integral and proportional control. High gain values cause the circuit to respond very slowly and can leave one susceptible to noise and high frequency oscillation (as the circuit becomes too slow to respond quickly). Too low and the circuit is prone to overshooting the SP value. However, in some cases overshooting the SP value by any significant amount must be avoided and thus a higher derivative gain (along with lower proportional gain) can be used. The chart below explains the effects of increasing the gain of any one of the parameters independently.

Parameter IncreasedRise TimeOvershootSettling TimeSteady-State ErrorStability
KpDecreaseIncreaseSmall ChangeDecreaseDegrade
KiDecreaseIncreaseIncreaseDecrease SignificantlyDegrade
KdMinor DecreaseMinor DecreaseMinor DecreaseNo EffectImprove (for small Kd)

Tuning

In general the gains of P, I, and D will need to be adjusted by the user in order to best servo the system. While there is not a static set of rules for what the values should be for any specific system, following the general procedures should help in tuning a circuit to match one’s system and environment. In general a PID circuit will typically overshoot the SP value slightly and then quickly damp out to reach the SP value.

Manual tuning of the gain settings is the simplest method for setting the PID controls. However, this procedure is done actively (the PID controller turned on and properly attached to the system) and requires some amount of experience to fully integrate. To tune your PID controller manually, first the integral and derivative gains are set to zero. Increase the proportional gain until you observe oscillation in the output. Your proportional gain should then be set to roughly half this value. After the proportional gain is set, increase the integral gain until any offset is corrected for on a time scale appropriate for your system. If you increase this gain too much, you will observe significant overshoot of the SP value and instability in the circuit. Once the integral gain is set, the derivative gain can then be increased. Derivative gain will reduce overshoot and damp the system quickly to the SP value. If you increase the derivative gain too much, you will see large overshoot (due to the circuit being too slow to respond). By playing with the gain settings, you can maximize the performance of your PID circuit, resulting in a circuit that quickly responds to changes in the system and effectively damps out oscillation about the SP value.

Control TypeKpKiKd
P0.50 Ku--
PI0.45 Ku1.2 Kp/Pu-
PID0.60 Ku2 Kp/PuKpPu/8

While manual tuning can be very effective at setting a PID circuit for your specific system, it does require some amount of experience and understanding of PID circuits and response. The Ziegler-Nichols method for PID tuning offers a bit more structured guide to setting PID values. Again, you’ll want to set the integral and derivative gain to zero. Increase the proportional gain until the circuit starts to oscillate. We will call this gain level Ku. The oscillation will have a period of Pu. Gains are for various control circuits are then given below in the chart.

Hide Benchtop TEC Controller

Benchtop TEC Controller

Part Number
Description
Price
Availability
TED4015
Benchtop TEC Controller, ±15 A / 225 W
$3,210.00
Today
Hide TEC Element Connector Cables

TEC Element Connector Cables

Item # CAB4000 CAB4001 CON4001
Click Image to Enlarge CAB4000 CAB4001 CON4001
Description Standard TEC Element Cable High Current TEC Element Cable 17W2 Male and Female
Connector Kit (One Each)
Max Current 5 A 20 A 20 A
Connector Type 17W2 Male to DB-9 Female 17W2 Male to 17W2 Male Loose 17W2 Connectors,
Male and Female

These cables connect our TED4015 temperature controller or our ITC4000 series dual current / temperature controllers to thermoelectric cooling elements. We also provide loose 17W2 connectors for customers who wish to make their own cables. For the pinout of the CAB4000 cable, please see the Pin Diagrams tab.

Please note that one CAB4000 cable and one CON4001 connector set are included with the purchase of a TED4015 benchtop controller.

Part Number
Description
Price
Availability
CAB4000
Connection Cable for TED4000/ITC4000, 17W2 to D-Sub-9, 5 A
$115.00
Today
CAB4001
Connection Cable for TED4000/ITC4000, 17W2 to 17W2, 20 A
$170.00
Today
CON4001
Connector Kit, 17W2 Male & Female, 20 A
$22.00
Today
Hide TED4000 Series Calibration Service

TED4000 Series Calibration Service

Part Number
Description
Price
Availability
CAL-TED4000
Recalibration Service for TED4000
$220.00
Lead Time